Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program
SOW Report
Contract 37004: 2003-022-00 EXP MONITOR/EVAL OKANOGAN BASIN PRODUCTION
Project Number:
Title:
Okanogan Basin Monitoring & Evaluation Program (OBMEP)
Stage:
Implementation
Area:
Province Subbasin %
Columbia Cascade Okanogan 100.00%
Contract Number:
37004
Contract Title:
2003-022-00 EXP MONITOR/EVAL OKANOGAN BASIN PRODUCTION
Contract Continuation:
Previous: Next:
31582: 2003-022-00 EXP MONITOR/EVALUATE OKANOGAN BASIN PRODUCTION
  • 41801: 2003-022-00 EXP MONITOR/EVAL OKANOGAN BASIN PRODUCTION
Contract Status:
Closed
Contract Description:
Performance and Budget Period:  March 1 - February 28

Project title:  Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program (OBMEP)

Project number:  200302200

Technical Contact:  John Arterburn, Fisheries Biologist II
Colville Confederated Tribes, Fish and Wildlife Department
23 Brooks Tracts Rd. Omak, WA 98841(509) 422-7424
john.arterburn@colvilletribes.com

Contracting Contact:  Colette Adolph, Contract Specialist
Colville Confederated Tribes, Fish and Wildlife Department
PO. Box 150, Nespelem, WA 99155
(509) 634-2124
colette.adolph@colvilletribes.com

Project goal:
Monitoring and Evaluation of anadromous fish at a sub-basin scale requires a long-term commitment as most outcomes will not be realized for 7 to 20+ years.  This project is designed to ultimately achieve these goals:

1.  Determine if there is a meaningful biological change at the population scale for summer/fall, spring Chinook, sockeye, and steelhead in the Okanogan basin (7-20+ year time frame).  

2.  Determine if there is a meaningful change in selected physical habitat parameters over time (12-20+ year time frame).

3.  Determine if selected water quality parameters are changing over time in the Okanogan basin (5-20+ year time frame).

4. Determine if change is occurring at specific locations throughout the Okanogan basin resulting from the cumulative benefits of habitat restoration actions (12-20+ year time frame).

5. Administer contracts and ensure that this effort continues in the long-term in a scientifically sound manner that ensures a closely coordinated effort across the Okanogan River Basin, Geo-political boundaries, Upper Columbia ESU, Columbia River basin, and Pacific Northwest region (20+ year time frame).

This program is designed to address a multitude of questions and at the same time eliminate duplication of work, reduce costs, and increase monitoring efficiency.  The implementation of valid statistical designs, probabilistic sampling, standardized data collection protocols, consistent data reporting methods, and selection of sensitive indicators will increase monitoring efficacy.  For this program to be successful, all organizations involved must be willing to cooperate and freely share information.  Cooperation includes sharing monitoring responsibilities, adjusting or changing sampling methods to comport with standardized protocols, and adhering to statistical design criteria.  In those cases where the standardized method for measuring an indicator is different from what was used in the past, it may be necessary to measure the indicator with both methods for a few years so that a relationship can be developed between the two methods.  

Primary Goal for 2008:
Implement a basin wide monitoring and evaluation program to the best extent possible given limited funding. Collect data using standardized OBMEP protocols and construct or maintain needed infrastructure.  Our efforts in 2007, will contribute to maintaining  long-term data sets that will provide status and trend data for all anadromous fish species in the Okanogan River basin and provide a basis for evaluating the overall effectiveness of salmon recovery and restoration projects conducted throughout the basin.


Although this project has been limited by a lack of full funding, we will attempt to address as many fundamental questions related to management and recovery of anadromous salmonids as those funds allow.  Including basic uncertainties about targeted fish population processes, with respect to both the trends in abundance and the factors regulating salmonid population dynamics.  When coupled with well-coordinated management actions, this program will help resource managers prescribe integrated management actions and assess the successes and failures of achieving the desired abundance, distribution, and trends of targeted fish populations.  Moreover, well-coordinated management actions, when coupled with this relevant monitoring and evaluation program will reduce uncertainty about the effect of actions on population productivity.

The Colville Tribes have used, extended, and modified the structure and methods employed by the Monitoring Strategy for the Upper Columbia Basin (Hillman 2004) for use in the Okanogan subbasin in the design of the OBMEP program.  OBMEP is aligned tightly with the priorities expressed in Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program, Subbasin Plans, NOAA Fisheries guidance, 2004 BIOP, the Upper Columbia Salmon recovery Plan and the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) have placed on monitoring and evaluation.  

The Okanogan subbasin plan calls for its vision to be supported by nine priority themes that represent the large scale agreement between all stake holders within the subbasin. The eighth theme is “continue Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation” and OBMEP is specifically linked to this activity;  

“Continued Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation: To apply adaptive management and make informed decisions will require an on-going commitment to research, monitoring and evaluation. Research allows important questions to be answered in a scientific rather than subjective manner and allows the best possible decisions on how and why to take a specific course of action. A considerable lack of knowledge exists in the Okanogan and this situation will continue to exist without continued research efforts. Evaluation of monitoring data, remote sensing data, and information from areas outside the Okanogan subbasin will also provide a mechanism to determine if progress is being made toward achieving the priority themes, and objectives contained in the subbasin plan. To track progress and inaugurate an adaptive management process, the subbasin plan relies upon a sound monitoring framework outlined under the Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program (OBMEP). This program was developed concurrently with Bonneville’s and NOAA fisheries IMW pilot studies in the Wenatchee, John Day and Salmon River systems; with guidance provided by the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; the Coordinated Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Projects; the federal Research Monitoring and Evaluation Program, and, is directly limited to the Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery plan as the monitoring vehicle for listed stocks in the Okanogan subbasin. This monitoring plan will also continue to evolve as the region continues toward a fully integrated regional monitoring approach, but has at its core, the ability to effectively track status and trend for fish populations and habitat indicators in the interim.  Specific monitoring elements targeting hatchery and wild fish performance, disease, genetics, fish morphology, ecological interactions and other parameters will be added as additional production programs come on line.”(Okanogan Subbasin Plan, Management Plan, page 9).

Within the Okanogan subbasin, independent research projects and piecemeal monitoring activities were conducted by various state, federal, tribal, agencies, and to some extent by watershed councils or landowners, until the creation of OBMEP. Today these efforts are coordinated into a cohesive overall framework for RM&E efforts related to salmon and steelhead fish stocks.

OBMEP is specifically designed to address status and trend monitoring for the Okanogan subbasin over the next 20+ years. Benefits to generating information on listed and non-listed fish will accrue in three different ways: (i) by supporting direct management of these species with respect to exploitation and recovery planning; (ii) by supporting the planning, development and implementation of restoration and recovery actions directly benefiting the listed and non-listed populations; and (iii) by supporting the planning, development and implementation of management actions indirectly impacting salmonid populations.

Sampling Design:
The intent of status/trend monitoring is to accurately describe existing conditions in the basin and to document changes in conditions over time. This requires temporal and spatial replication and probabilistic sampling. As adapted from Hillman (2004), we implemented the EMAP sampling framework, a statistically based and spatially explicit sampling design, to quantify trends in juvenile and adult salmonids and status and trends in stream and riparian habitats.  For more information see Hillman (2004).

In the Okanogan basin, EMAP sites were selected according to the generalized random tessellation stratified design (GRTS+) (Stevens 1997; Stevens and Olsen 1999; Stevens and Urquhart 2000; Stevens 2002).  Briefly, the GRTS design achieves a random, nearly regular sample point pattern via a random function that maps two-dimensional space onto a one-dimensional line (linear space).  A systematic sample is selected in the linear space, and the sample points are mapped back into two-dimensional space.  The GRTS design is used to select samples for all panels. OBMEP site selection process began with collaboration with Tony Olsen and the EPA regional office located in Corvallis, OR who provided the random sample of 300 possible sites. Once selected OBMEP then verified these sites for access, secured landowner permissions when necessary, and reduced the list to the 150 sites spilt between the United States and Canada portions of the Okanogan basin. A map of these sites can be obtained off our web-site at:  http://nrd.colvilletribes.com/obmep/uscansites.htm

The Monitoring Strategy for the Upper Columbia Basin (Hillman 2004) recommends a suite of biological and physical/environmental indicators suitable for status and trend monitoring. Not all indicators listed in the Hillman document are relevant for the Okanogan subbasin. The protocols provide general instructions for collecting data, but specific methodologies that alter temporal, spatial, and economic realities make sampling some of the indicators more feasible than others. The indicators selected and the methods used to collect these data were adapted from Hillman (2004).  Protocols were developed specifically for the Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Project (OBMEP) to be compatible with both the Monitoring Strategy for the Upper Columbia Basin (Hillman 2004) and the Ecosystems Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) model input fields. The Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment process was previously used to identify limiting factors for anadromous fish in the assessment portion of the Okanogan Subbasin Plan and its ongoing use will require periodic updates of these data provided through OBMEP in future iterations.

To summarize data management activities to date, considerable investments have been made in developing a functional database system that allows for data to be collected in the field and assimilated with a minimum of man power and repetitive analysis can be conducted at the push of a single key. However, what remains to be completed is to connect this database with the regional data repositories like Stream-net. This work is beyond this scope of work but is acknowledged that OBMEP will play a roll in helping the region close this gap. OBMEP generates data and provides information, knowledge and expertise to BPA, NPCC, CSMEP, the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership (PNAMP) and other established regional monitoring programs in the Columbia River basin. We will continue to provide input and products derived from our own experiences in the Okanogan. On a more local scale, OBMEP provides information to state-wide salmon recovery efforts and regional forums across the upper Columbia ESU and Columbia Cascade province. We coordinate monitoring and evaluation efforts with the Upper Columbia Regional Technical Team and with the Wenatchee subbasin RM&E program (BPA #200301700). We work to ensure that data collected from our efforts can be “rolled-up” with data from other regional populations for broader, spatial scale application.

The Okanogan River is an international watershed and the OBMEP project does not stop at international borders.  We facilitate collecting seamless data by collaborating with the Okanogan Nation Alliance (ONA), who in turn facilitates collaboration with other Canadian stakeholders such as Environment Canada, the Ministry of Land, Water, and Air Protection, and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. We developed clear guidance for the collection of all field data.  To vet our standardized field protocols, the Canadian effort in the Okanagan River basin was phased in one-year after data collection began in the United States portion of the Okanogan River basin.  This allowed us to assess the compatibility of our guidance documents through field testing.   Within the Okanogan subbasin, our efforts are coordinated with other management agencies and stakeholder groups that are collecting information to ensure that no duplication of efforts occurs within this watershed. Data are consolidated within the OBMEP program and onto a server located at our offices and also distributed to NMFS, UCSRB, and summarized into annual reports and presentations that are provided to BPA and other regional stakeholders on both sides of the border.

There have been numerous recent administrative and scientific calls for a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation program to provide consistent, region-wide information about the status of salmon populations and their response to management actions (Botkin et al. 2000, ISAB 2001, ISRP 2001).  In addition, the Biological Opinion on the Federal Columbia River Power System requires the development and implementation of a coordinated monitoring and evaluation program (NMFS 2000a).  The call for developing a consistent, region-wide monitoring program has been strong and widespread.  Once implemented, the OBMEP project increases our ability to conduct effective recovery planning and address a number of outstanding scientific agendas.  This comprehensive monitoring program provides a scientifically robust method for evaluating the status of populations while contributing information essential for evaluating the ESU for progress toward recovery goals such as the de-listing criteria defined by the regional TRT’s (NMFS 2000b).  A basin-wide monitoring program also provides the means to develop and refine appropriate performance measures and standards for conservation actions, thus giving managers the information to quantitatively assess the impact that composite restoration actions have on fish populations.  

The OBMEP status, trend and effectiveness monitoring program will not only help address these scientifically-based policy agendas, but will also help provide the framework for addressing substantive administrative issues.  One such issue is implementing requirements for developing the monitoring and evaluation program outlined in the NMFS 2000 Biological Opinion on the Federal Columbia River Power System (Actions 180-184, 188, 190, 191, 193, and 195-7), specifically population and habitat status monitoring for anadromous salmonids as required under Action Item 180, and elements of the habitat action effectiveness monitoring as required under Action Item 183.
Account Type(s):
Expense
Contract Start Date:
03/01/2008
Contract End Date:
03/31/2009
Current Contract Value:
$796,517
Expenditures:
$796,517

* Expenditures data includes accruals and are based on data through 31-May-2022.

Env. Compliance Lead:
Contract Contractor:
Contract Type:
Contract (IGC)
Pricing Method:
Cost Reimbursement (CNF)
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Full Name Organization Write Permission Contact Role Email Work Phone
Colette Adolph Colville Confederated Tribes Yes Administrative Contact colette.adolph@colvilletribes.com (509) 422-5652
John Arterburn Colville Confederated Tribes Yes Contract Manager john.arterburn@colvilletribes.com (509) 422-7424
Nikki Dick Colville Confederated Tribes Yes Administrative Contact nikki.dick@colvilletribes.com (509) 631-2200
Peter N. Johnson No Technical Contact
Keith Kistler Colville Confederated Tribes No Technical Contact keith.kistler@colvilletribes.com (509) 422-7429
Peter Lofy Bonneville Power Administration Yes F&W Approver ptlofy@bpa.gov (503) 230-4193
Cindy McCartney Colville Confederated Tribes No Administrative Contact cindy.mccartney@colvilletribes.com (509) 634-2112
Jenifer Mccune Bonneville Power Administration No Contracting Officer jamccune@bpa.gov (503) 230-7429
Joe Peone Colville Confederated Tribes No Supervisor joe.peone@colvilletribes.com (509) 634-2113
Michael Rayton Colville Confederated Tribes No Technical Contact michael.rayton@colvilletribes.com (509) 422-7434
David Roberts Bonneville Power Administration Yes COTR daroberts@bpa.gov (503) 230-4511
Tom Sargent Colville Confederated Tribes No Interested Party tom.sargent@colvilletribes.com (509) 634-2853
Nancy Weintraub Bonneville Power Administration Yes Env. Compliance Lead nhweintraub@bpa.gov (503) 230-5373
Debra Wulff Colville Confederated Tribes No Administrative Contact debra.wulff@colvilletribes.com (509) 634-2109


Viewing of Work Statement Elements

Deliverable Title WSE Sort Letter, Number, Title Start End Complete
Submit Final Mar 2007 to Feb 2008 Annual Report to BPA COTR for posting B: 132. Produce annual report based on tasks identified within this scope of work 08/31/2008 07/18/2008
Applicable permits and other environmental clearances received C: 165. Environmental Compliance 02/28/2009 02/28/2009
EDT assessment and report D: 156. Develop methods for habitat status and trend analysis 02/28/2009
Data on juvenile summer steelhead abundance at all EMAP locations E: 157. Juvenile summer snorkel surveys at EMAP sites 11/30/2008 12/15/2008
Data on out-migrating smolts and parr from the Okanogan River subbasin F: 157. Okanogan River summer Chinook and steelhead smolt trapping 02/28/2009 02/28/2009
Data on adult anadromous fish passing Zosel Dam G: 157. Enumerate adult salmonid using underwater video at Zosel Dam 02/28/2009 02/28/2009
Data on adult steelhead entering into Inkaneep Creek, development of video arrays. H: 157. Steelhead enumeration in tributary streams using picket weir traps and video counts 03/31/2009 02/28/2009
Spawner abundance, timing, and distribution data for summer steelhead I: 157. Conduct census redd counts for summer steelhead throughout the Okanogan River subbasin 07/15/2008 06/30/2008
Physical habitat data from 50 sites K: 157. Collect physical habitat data at up to 50 EMAP sampling sites 02/28/2009 02/28/2009
Web accessible data for discharge and temperature M: 157. Operate & maintain 6 real-time discharge, temperature gauging stations in Okanogan subbasin 02/28/2009 02/28/2009
Continuous water temperature data from 33 tributary EMAP sites. O: 157. Collect continuous water temperature data from 31 tributary EMAP sites 02/28/2009 02/28/2009
Deliverables as stipulated by BPA Q: 119. Manage Projects: produce invoices, accrual estimates, develop contracts, etc. 02/28/2009 02/28/2009
Coordination efforts will be described in the Annual Report R: 189. Project coordination/public outreach 02/28/2009 02/28/2009
Presentations at conferences, updated OBMEP website S: 161. Support of OBMEP web site and workshop/conference attendance 02/28/2009 02/28/2009
Input of this years data, plus modification and auditing of our existing database architecture T: 160. Manage, maintain, and expand the OBMEP database 02/28/2009 02/28/2009
Data summaries of habitat, biological and water quality parameters U: 162. Analyze collected and historical data on habitat, biological, and water quality parameters 02/28/2009 02/28/2009

Viewing of Implementation Metrics
Viewing of Environmental Metrics Customize

Primary Focal Species Work Statement Elements
Chinook (O. tshawytscha) - Upper Columbia River Spring ESU (Endangered)
  • 6 instances of WE 157 Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data
  • 1 instance of WE 148 Install Flow Measuring Device
Chinook (O. tshawytscha) - Upper Columbia River Summer/Fall ESU
  • 9 instances of WE 157 Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data
  • 1 instance of WE 161 Disseminate Raw/Summary Data and Results
Sockeye (O. nerka) - Okanogan River ESU
  • 4 instances of WE 157 Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data
Steelhead (O. mykiss) - Upper Columbia River DPS (Threatened)
  • 11 instances of WE 157 Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data
  • 1 instance of WE 161 Disseminate Raw/Summary Data and Results
  • 1 instance of WE 162 Analyze/Interpret Data
  • 1 instance of WE 148 Install Flow Measuring Device

Sort WE ID WE Title NEPA NOAA USFWS NHPA Has Provisions Inadvertent Discovery Completed
A 185 Periodic Status Reports for BPA 02/09/2007
B 132 Produce annual report based on tasks identified within this scope of work 02/09/2007
C 165 Environmental Compliance 02/09/2007
D 156 Develop methods for habitat status and trend analysis 02/09/2007
E 157 Juvenile summer snorkel surveys at EMAP sites 02/09/2007
F 157 Okanogan River summer Chinook and steelhead smolt trapping 02/09/2007
G 157 Enumerate adult salmonid using underwater video at Zosel Dam 02/09/2007
H 157 Steelhead enumeration in tributary streams using picket weir traps and video counts 02/09/2007
I 157 Conduct census redd counts for summer steelhead throughout the Okanogan River subbasin 02/09/2007
J 157 PLACEHOLDER: Collect water quality data for all EMAP tributary sites 02/09/2007
K 157 Collect physical habitat data at up to 50 EMAP sampling sites 02/09/2007
L 157 PLACEHOLDER: Collect and process macro invertebrate samples 02/09/2007
M 157 Operate & maintain 6 real-time discharge, temperature gauging stations in Okanogan subbasin 02/09/2007
N 148 PLACEHOLDER: Install one real time stream gauge on Salmon or Loup Loup creek 02/09/2007
O 157 Collect continuous water temperature data from 31 tributary EMAP sites 02/09/2007
P 157 PLACEHOLDER: Address known data gaps in the Okanogan Basin (Predator Study) 02/09/2007
Q 119 Manage Projects: produce invoices, accrual estimates, develop contracts, etc. 02/09/2007
R 189 Project coordination/public outreach 02/09/2007
S 161 Support of OBMEP web site and workshop/conference attendance 02/09/2007
T 160 Manage, maintain, and expand the OBMEP database 02/09/2007
U 162 Analyze collected and historical data on habitat, biological, and water quality parameters 02/09/2007