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Project Summary

Project 1997-011-00 - Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement
Project Number:
1997-011-00
Title:
Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement
Summary:
Project Goal:

The Duck Valley Indian Reservation's Habitat Enhancement program is an ongoing project designed to enhance and protect critical riparian areas, natural springs, the Owyhee River and its tributaries, Bruneau River tributaries, and native fish and wildlife habitat on the Reservation. The project commenced in 1997 and addresses the Northwest Power Planning Council's measures 10.8C.2, 10.8C.3, and 10.8C.5 of the 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

Background:

The Habitat Enhancement and Protection Program (HEPP) was developed and implemented in 1997 in response to concerns about the impacts of land use practices on fish and wildlife habitat, and the project is designed to mitigate these impacts by enhancing and protecting critical riparian areas. These areas are enhanced by improving adjacent backcountry roads to reduce non-point source pollution, fencing and trough placement at natural springs and headwaters areas, restoring and protecting the Owyhee River, its tributaries, and wetland areas, and overall protection of native fish and wildlife habitat on the Duck Valley Indian Reservation (DVIR). Critical protection areas are determined in coordination with the Tribes' Assess Resident Fish project (BPA project number 2000-079-00) where streams were sampled for populations of native redband trout. This information facilitates the determination of management objectives for the Owyhee River and its tributaries.

The majority of springs on the DVIR are located on grazing lands. Consequently, livestock searching for water tend to find the springs and trample the sensitive riparian areas around the springs. This trampling can cause a shift in ground topography or composition and alter the spring flow, water quality, and water temperatures. The cold, clean water from these springs entering creeks provides a refuge for cold-water fish species, such as native redband trout (Oncorhyncus mykiss gairdneri), especially in the late summer months. The goals of protecting the springs are enhancing productivity and water quality of springs that flow into native fish habitat, preventing damage, and allowing damaged springs to recover. These goals are met by using exclosure fencing and off-site stock watering through the use of gravity-fed water troughs, installing culverts in roads where spring water pools or runs, and planting native vegetation where necessary.

Another portion of the project involves protecting streams and the East Fork of the Owyhee River, prioritizing the protection of native fish populations. This is accomplished with exclosure fencing, off-site livestock watering, protection of springs that flow into the creeks, and native vegetation planting to reduce erosion, to provide shade and cooler water temperatures, and to provide habitat, cover, and forage. Suspended solids and fine particles can be abrasive to fish gills, and fines can also interrupt spawning habitat by entombing fertilized eggs or by blocking off oxygenated water, which results in high mortality rates for eggs and sac-fry. Reduction in these fines will increase fish survival rates within these waters.

The Tribes also actively engage in enhancing unimproved backcountry roads, as these roads and associated vehicles can contribute significant amounts of sediments and hydrocarbon pollution to the streams and spring water. Unimproved backcountry dirt roads on the DVIR provide access to more than 2/3 of the Reservation's acreage. The eastern third of the Reservation rises to a high plateau 3,000 feet above the valley floor, and several of the roads, like the Skull Creek and North Fork of Skull Creek roads, follow creeks as they rise to the plateau, resulting in undeveloped stream crossings, and roads constructed in or adjacent to the stream's floodplain, causing erosion, high sediment loads, and hydrocarbon pollution in the streams. These two streams, Skull Creek and the North Fork of Skull Creek, both support pure populations of native redband trout. Common erosion channels travel down the roads forming six to twelve-inch ruts, and leave the roads forming small gullies, contributing an unnatural sediment load in the creeks. The creeks undercut the roads in other places, also causing unnatural sediment loads. The Tribes utilize engineering and bioengineering techniques to mitigate these problems, including installation of culverts, native vegetation, geoweb, geo-jute, drainage dips, and bankfull dams as well as redirecting stream flows or relocating road crossings.
Proposer:
None
Proponent Orgs:
Shoshone-Paiute Tribes (Tribe)
Starting FY:
1998
Ending FY:
2017
BPA PM:
Stage:
Implementation - Project Status Report
Area:
Province Subbasin %
Middle Snake Owyhee 100.00%
Purpose:
Habitat
Emphasis:
Restoration/Protection
Focal Species:
Trout, Interior Redband
Trout, Rainbow
Wildlife
Species Benefit:
Anadromous: 75.0%   Resident: 25.0%   Wildlife: 0.0%
Special:
None
BiOp Association:
None

Location of the DVIR in relation to the Pacific Northwest

Figure Name: Figure 1

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 7

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Old style steel post corner brace

Figure Name: Figure 4

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 20

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Heavy duty rock jack

Figure Name: Figure 5

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 20

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Example of beaver activity at West Strickland Canyon Area

Figure Name: Figure 7

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 26

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

“Beaver Deceiver” installed in FY2009 at the Strickland Canyon riparian fence project

Figure Name: Figure 8

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 27

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

the “Castor Master” is designed to maintain the water level of a beaver pond that is close to a road or risks flooding an area

Figure Name: Figure 9

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 27

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

The “Double Filter System” is a non-lethal method of deterring beavers from blocking/plugging culverts

Figure Name: Figure 10

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 27

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Crew fabricating head boxes at HEPP shop

Figure Name: Figure 12

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 31

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Fabricated headbox front side

Figure Name: Figure 13

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 31

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Fabricated headbox back side

Figure Name: Figure 14

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 31

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Perforated PVC water collection device installed

Figure Name: Figure 15

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 32

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Perforated PVC water collection device

Figure Name: Figure 16

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 32

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Shows installation of a “seep type” water collection device

Figure Name: Figure 17

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 32

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Shows installation of a “seep type” water collection device

Figure Name: Figure 18

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 32

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Cover top with weed barrier to prevent fine sediments from plugging the system

Figure Name: Figure 19

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 33

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

First head box during installation

Figure Name: Figure 22

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 34

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

First head box installed with rock lining the stream

Figure Name: Figure 23

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 35

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Second head box during Installation

Figure Name: Figure 24

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 35

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Trough far above the valley floor directly above Sheep Creek

Figure Name: Figure 26

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 36

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

East Radio Tower spring with livestock drinking water

Figure Name: Figure 27

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 37

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

East Radio Tower spring before development of off-site water

Figure Name: Figure 28

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 37

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

East Radio Tower spring with head box installed

Figure Name: Figure 29

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 38

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Construction of pipe fence to protect head box and spring head

Figure Name: Figure 30

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 38

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

South Fawn Creek spring during fence construction

Figure Name: Figure 32

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 40

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

South Fawn Creek Spring during fence construction

Figure Name: Figure 33

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 40

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

South Fawn Creek Spring during “Seep Type” water development

Figure Name: Figure 34

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 41

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

South Fawn Creek spring during “seep type” water development

Figure Name: Figure 35

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 41

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

South Fawn Creek spring water trough just above East Fork Owyhee River with livestock utilizing it one day after installation

Figure Name: Figure 36

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 42

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

South Fawn Creek spring water trough just above East Fork Owyhee River with livestock utilizing it one day after installation

Figure Name: Figure 37

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 42

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

South Fawn Creek spring development project

Figure Name: Figure 38

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 42

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Lower West Cold Springs in FY2009 when site was selected for off-site water development

Figure Name: Figure 39

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 43

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Lower West Cold Springs in FY10 when project was scheduled for development

Figure Name: Figure 40

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 43

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Lower West Cold Springs with fence constructed

Figure Name: Figure 41

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 44

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Summit Creek Road stream crossing before installation of culvert

Figure Name: Figure 43

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 46

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Summit Creek Road stream crossing after installation of culvert

Figure Name: Figure 44

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 46

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Summit Creek Road stream crossing after installation of culvert

Figure Name: Figure 45

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 47

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Cleveland Trail stream crossing before installation of a culvert

Figure Name: Figure 46

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 47

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Cleveland Trail stream crossing after installation of a culvert & reseeding of the area disturbed

Figure Name: Figure 47

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 48

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Water B. spring before fence construction

Figure Name: Figure 49

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 51

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Water B. spring before fence construction

Figure Name: Figure 50

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 51

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Water B. spring before fence construction

Figure Name: Figure 51

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 52

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Water B. spring fence constructed

Figure Name: Figure 52

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 52

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Upper Summit Creek 1 spring head before fence construction

Figure Name: Figure 53

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 53

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Upper Summit Creek 1 fence constructed

Figure Name: Figure 54

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 53

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Upper Summit Creek 1 fence constructed

Figure Name: Figure 55

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 54

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Upper Summit Creek 2 spring head before fence construction

Figure Name: Figure 56

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 54

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Upper Summit Creek 2 fence constructed

Figure Name: Figure 57

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 55

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Head of Mary’s Creek 1 spring head area before fence construction

Figure Name: Figure 58

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 56

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Head of Mary’s Creek 1 fence construction

Figure Name: Figure 59

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 56

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643

Head of Mary’s Creek 2 spring head area before fence construction

Figure Name: Figure 60

Document ID: P125365

Document: Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement Program; 11/09 - 10/10

Page Number: 57

Project: 1997-011-00

Contract: 55643


Summary of Budgets

To view all expenditures for all fiscal years, click "Project Exp. by FY"

Expense SOY Budget Working Budget Contracted Amount Modified Contract Amount Expenditures *
FY2016 (Previous) $302,752 $302,752 $302,752 $302,752 $281,637

General $302,752 $302,752 $302,752 $281,637
FY2017 (Current) $302,752 $302,752 $302,752 $302,752 $120,838

General $302,752 $302,752 $302,752 $120,838
FY2018 (Next) $0 $0 $0 $0

General $0 $0 $0 $0

* Expenditures data includes accruals and are based on data through 31-Mar-2017

Decided Budget Transfers  (FY2016 - FY2018)

Acct FY Acct Type Amount Fund Budget Decision Date
FY2016 Expense $302,752 From: General FY16 Initial Planning Budgets - Expense 05/22/2015
FY2017 Expense $302,752 From: General FY17 SOY Budgets 06/02/2016

Pending Budget Decision?  No


Project Cost Share:

FY2016 0 %
FY2015 0 %
FY2014 0 %
FY2013 0 %
FY2012 0 %
FY2011 2 %
FY2010 2 %
FY2009 0 %
FY2008 0 %
FY2007 0 %
Fiscal Year Cost Share Partner Total Proposed
Contribution
Total Confirmed
Contribution
FY2016 (Unspecified Org) $0

Contracts

The table below contains contracts with the following statuses: Active, Complete, History, Issued.
Expense Contracts:
Number Contractor Name Title Status Contracted Amount Dates
4706 SOW Shoshone-Paiute Tribes 1997-011-00 DUCK VALLEY RESERVATION HABITAT ENHANCEMENT History $294,722 4/16/2001 - 4/15/2002
24946 SOW Shoshone-Paiute Tribes 1997-011-00 DUCK VALLEY INDIAN RESERVATION HABITAT ENHANCEMENT History $200,110 11/1/2005 - 10/31/2006
30066 SOW Shoshone-Paiute Tribes 1997-011-00 DUCK VALLEY INDIAN RESERVATION HABITAT ENHANCEMENT History $275,165 11/1/2006 - 10/31/2007
71775 SOW Shoshone-Paiute Tribes 1997-011-00 EXP SHOSHONE-PAIUTE HABITAT ENHANCEMENT_RESIDENT FISH Issued $302,752 3/1/2016 - 2/28/2017



Annual Progress Reports
Expected (since FY2004):16
Completed:5
On time:5
Status Reports
Completed:54
On time:24
Avg Days Late:26

Earliest Subsequent           Accepted Count of Contract Deliverables
Contract Contract(s) Title Contractor Start End Status Reports Complete Green Yellow Red Total % Green and Complete Canceled
4821 24946, 30066, 35726, 40120, 45228, 51592, 55643, 60490, 65437, 68248, 71775 1997-011-00 DUCK VALLEY RESERVATION HABITAT ENHANCEMENT Shoshone-Paiute Tribes 04/2001 04/2001 Pending 54 146 0 0 48 194 75.26% 0
Project Totals 54 146 0 0 48 194 75.26% 0


Review: Resident Fish, Regional Coordination, and Data Management Category Review

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 1997-011-00-ISRP-20120215
Project: 1997-011-00 - Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement
Review: Resident Fish, Regional Coordination, and Data Management Category Review
Proposal Number: RESCAT-1997-011-00
Completed Date: 4/16/2012
Final Round ISRP Date: 4/3/2012
Final Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria (Qualified)
Final Round ISRP Comment:

The portion of the response describing priority ranking of habitat enhancement sites is somewhat unclear because the response states "a priority ranking based on water quality" will be used but also states that Tribal departments meet to rate potential habitat enhancement projects based on Tribal goals to "enhance productivity and water quality of springs and streams that support native fish habitat." The cause of confusion is whether the goal is to enhance productivity of springs and streams for other than native fish or do native fish have priority in selecting activities to enhance productivity and water quality? The ISRP suggests that the sponsors should make clear during contracting that the project will prioritize native fish needs over other productivity and water quality considerations.

The sponsors adequately provided specific references to appropriate RM&E components of the project.The sponsors are urged to interpret results with caution because controls may be biased due to non-random initial selection of treatment sites. Random selection from both treatment and control sites after treatments have been purposefully applied to selected sites is not a valid method of randomization. The proposed methodology of identifying directional hypotheses (one-tailed), focal species, and indicators is appreciated.

The ISRP appreciated receiving details of responses in North Fork Skull and Strickland Canyon creeks to fencing and had several comments. It is clear that extensive beaver activity poses challenges to monitoring. Under the circumstances staff should consider some modifications or additions to sampling protocol. Larger fish in pools will need to be sampled by snorkeling, if feasible, or raft-mounted electrofishing. Using backpack shockers to make a mark-recapture estimate would not be successful as larger fish would not be included. It will be critical to understand the extent to which spawning is successful above beaver ponds or between them. Based on the data reported it appears that it may not be successfully occurring in Skull Creek. Also it is apparent that some individual trees need to be protected from beaver, and management of beaver numbers is needed if they are to continue to play a long-term positive role in the ecosystem.

The response about predation and non-native species, as regards proposed habitat work in the East Fork Owyhee River, is not entirely satisfactory. What evidence exists to support the expectation that lowering stream temperatures will impede bass movement into redband inhabited stream segments and limit predation? Evidence is needed that temperature changes resulting from habitat actions would be close enough to the critical temperature threshold to result in the desired shift in bass and redband behavior. This should be provided during contracting. Explanation of how human transport of non-native rainbow trout around the proposed elevated culvert in newly connected streams will be controlled and how migration of redband trout below the elevated culvert will be controlled should be provided during contracting. Adequate details were presented in the response to describe the placement of fish screens at the main Tribal irrigation diversion on the East Fork Owyhee River to protect wild redband trout.

The sponsors provided most of the information the ISRP requested. The ISRP qualifications can be resolved during contracting and do not require further ISRP review.

Qualification #1 - Qualification #1 - prioritize native fish needs
The portion of the response describing priority ranking of habitat enhancement sites is somewhat unclear, as described in comments below. The ISRP suggests that the sponsors should make clear during contracting that the project will prioritize native fish needs over other productivity and water quality considerations.
Qualification #2 - Qualification #2 - Status and Trend Monitoring Strategy
The extent to which monitoring data are being gathered at sites other than Skull and Strickland Canyon creeks is unclear. During the contracting process, it should be ascertained that the Status and Trend Monitoring Strategy plan of 2004 is being adequately followed elsewhere on the Reservation, as proscribed. The response indicates that the Tribe uses another site selection procedure different from the Status and Trend Monitoring Strategy plan, based on water quality standards set by Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and/or the EPA. It should be established during the contracting process that the original protocol is not compromised.
Qualification #3 - Qualification #3 - proposed habitat enhancement in the East Fork Owyhee River
Additional information supporting proposed habitat enhancement in the East Fork Owyhee River is needed during contracting, as described below.
First Round ISRP Date: 2/8/2012
First Round ISRP Rating: Response Requested
First Round ISRP Comment:

The sponsors need to provide the following:

1.      The procedure used for selecting and prioritizing potential habitat enhancement sites.

2.      The design of the RM&E program including sample site selection, methods, and metrics. Reviewers are aware that an RME plan was developed several years ago by BioAnalysts Inc., but specific references to appropriate components of that plan are needed.

3.      An analysis of the M&E data on habitat and fish that have been collected to date. Presumably this would be the evaluation of the 2006-2010 results being produced by a consultant, as mentioned in the proposal.

4.      Detail regarding Deliverable 17, a fish screen. Apparently there is the intent to install or replace one but no details are presented.

 1. Purpose: Significance to Regional Programs, Technical Background, and Objectives

The goal of this project is to protect and enhance stream and riparian habitat on the Duck Valley Indian Reservation. Cattle grazing is a major land use problem on the reservation. Most of the work conducted to date has focused on excluding cattle from springs and riparian areas to protect and restore stream habitat. The sponsors plan not only to continue this kind of work but also to begin instream habitat enhancement projects

The project is consistent with the Owyhee Subbasin Plan. The Technical Background could be more detailed. The problem statement is minimal and consists of one paragraph. It is simply a broad overview of the activities the Tribe is taking to protect and enhance habitat. The proposal would be improved with more discussion of the background and history of the project. This would include the progress that has been made over the years since project inception in 1997, the problems that have been encountered, how they have been addressed, and any changes in direction the project has taken. A map showing the location of some of the more important streams and springs would have been helpful. Details about the M&E program should be provided. 

The four objectives provide a relatively clear picture of what the proposed work is trying to accomplish.

2. History: Accomplishments, Results, and Adaptive Management (ISRP Review of Results)

The program has undertaken an impressive number of habitat enhancement and protection projects, as many as 130, but no quantitative results were presented on trends in habitat and fish from these projects. Rather the sponsors address implementation accomplishments in a lengthy list that identifies the location where work was done and the type of actions undertaken including off-channel water troughs and riparian and spring fencing, but present no results of this work. It is unclear how successful the habitat enhancement projects have been or how fish have benefited from the projects. There is no information given on status of fish populations.

The ISRP identified this problem in the 2007-09 review of this project. The comment is still apropos, “a summary of biological results is not provided. Past accomplishments refer to extensive monitoring and data collections, so one would hope that some habitat trend responses could have been reported on. The proposal, however, indicates the data and statistical analysis to support effectiveness monitoring is forthcoming as the M&E Plan is executed.” Analysis of data collected over the past 14 years by this project has not occurred. 

To their credit, the sponsors freely acknowledge this problem in their proposal: “Data analysis, data sharing and reporting remain the shortcomings of the program.” The sponsors also have made a commitment to undertake comprehensive data analysis: “The monitoring and evaluation data will be provided in a stand-alone report covering data from 2006 through 2010 scheduled for completion by spring 2012. Outstanding reports for FY2009 and FY2010 will be completed by February 28, 2012.”

More important for the current review is the statement: "The Tribes are currently in the process of contracting with an environmental consulting firm to tabulate and display the monitoring data collected by the Tribes from 2006-2010 which will allow the project manager, in conjunction with the department director and fisheries biologist, to analyze, interpret and report on the data that has been collected to-date. The project manager has projected completion date of January 31, 2012 for receipt of this work product." We are encouraged that the sponsors finally will be undertaking this analysis. That information should be made available to the ISRP in the response loop.

 ISRP Retrospective Evaluation of Results

The ISRP’s evaluation is pending a response from the sponsor.

3. Project Relationships, Emerging Limiting Factors, and Tailored Questions for Type of Work (hatchery, RME, tagging)

The sponsors state that their program accounts for potential effects of: 1) climate change; 2) non-native species; and 3) predation increases. How their work helps ameliorate climate change effects on water temperature is discussed briefly. It is not clear from the proposal how serious a problem non-native species and predation are, and how the proposed habitat work will help alleviate these problems. 

The sponsors speak of a status and trends monitoring program and an effectiveness monitoring program, but little detail concerning these programs is provided. The sponsors state that they will employ a GRTS sampling design for the program by referring to a protocol in MonitoringMethods.org, but few details about the design are provided. For example, have the actual field sites have been selected? Will the GRTS design include sites that have undergone habitat enhancement or just sites that have not been treated? It is unclear whether an M&E program has been in place or if this is a new effort.

4. Deliverables, Work Elements, Metrics, and Methods

Many of the deliverables listed are really components of the process such as report submission. Several of the deliverables seem to involve the M&E plan developed by BioAnalysts several years ago, but, as mentioned above, that reference is unclear enough to make understanding difficult. Deliverable 17 is to install or replace a fish screen and seems to lack further detail anywhere. More detail is needed.

The sponsors should have described their rationale for selecting and prioritizing potential project sites.

Modified by Dal Marsters on 4/16/2012 10:28:23 PM.

Modified by Dal Marsters on 4/16/2012 10:32:20 PM.
Documentation Links:
  • Proponent Response (3/8/2012)

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 1997-011-00-NPCC-20130807
Project: 1997-011-00 - Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement
Review: Resident Fish, Regional Coordination, and Data Management Category Review
Proposal: RESCAT-1997-011-00
Proposal State: Pending BPA Response
Approved Date: 3/5/2014
Recommendation: Implement with Conditions
Comments: Implement with condition through 2017. Sponsor to address ISRP qualifications in contracting.
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review

Legal Assessment (In-Lieu)

Assessment Number: 1997-011-00-INLIEU-20090521
Project Number: 1997-011-00
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 10/6/2006
In Lieu Rating: Problems Exist
Cost Share Rating: None
Comment: Multiple restoration activities; other entities may be authorized/required to conduct; also, basic premise is to address impacts in blocked areas; blockage is not solely due to FCRPS, so other hydro projects authorized/required to address; needs cost share or other remedy.

Capital Assessment

Assessment Number: 1997-011-00-CAPITAL-20090618
Project Number: 1997-011-00
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 2/27/2007
Capital Rating: Does Not Qualify for Capital Funding
Capital Asset Category: None
Comment: None

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 1997-011-00-ISRP-20060831
Project: 1997-011-00 - Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 8/31/2006
Final Round ISRP Date: None
Final Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria (Qualified)
Final Round ISRP Comment:
The proposal flows from outputs of the rather thorough, detailed, and interesting Owyhee Subbasin Plan. The proposal contains a (rather vague) description of the project by the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes to continue operation and maintenance (O&M) and implementation of spring and stream enhancement projects that protect wild fish stocks and improve the function of key watershed processes. Accomplishments since 1997 were largely related to protection of headwater areas, some stream habitat improvements recently, and development of the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) plan, at a cost of approximately $300,000 per year, with no end in sight, according to the sponsor's statement on future costs.

The proposal is reasonable and has a good M&E plan that the ISRP reviewed following the province reviews in response to the ISRP recommendation that the project was not fundable. This M&E plan is the strongest part of the project. The project also includes some good education/outreach activities. Overall, the general quality of the proposal has improved over the years of review. However, the ISRP's "fundable" recommendation is qualified because the sponsors have not provided evidence of many concrete accomplishments during the nine-year project funding duration, and most of the proposed effort is for O&M on what seem to be marginal activities.

The proposal does a reasonable job of listing the task-oriented accomplishments of the past nine years. However, a summary of biological results is not provided. Past accomplishments refer to extensive monitoring and data collections, so one would hope that some habitat trend responses could have been reported on. The proposal, however, indicates the data and statistical analysis to support effectiveness monitoring and evaluation is forthcoming as the M&E Plan is executed. Despite this forthcoming report, a narrative or at least a summary of the results is needed. Even the listing of project accomplishments could have been presented in a manner more helpful to reviewers in understanding the project's timeline toward overall DVIR objectives. For example, it could have listed the number of springs on DVIR, followed by the number that need protection, and then a listing of those that have been protected (by calendar year), then a projected listing of the number of springs to be protected out into the future by year. The same goes for riparian exclosures, cattle crossings, stream crossings, etc.

Other biological accomplishments are presented without explanation or reference documents, such as the statement that genetic analysis identified three pure redband populations (how was this determined, what lab determined it, and what documents are available for review that describe these results and analysis).

Biological objectives listed are actually work elements, and consist of fishery and habitat surveys, and protection of springs and streams from impacts. The latter refers mainly to work on culverts, fencing, and road crossings. Additional work involves ensuring previous works remain functional. Section F of the narrative (proposal biological objectives, work elements, and methods) was incomplete, and the weakest of the proposal, and requires more detailed description, including measurable outcomes.

Only one person is listed in Section I (Key Personnel). This section and sections on objectives and project history are incomplete.

Overall the proposal has merit but is deficient in reporting of past results and couching future plans in a larger overall context for DVIR goals.
Documentation Links:

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 1997-011-00-NPCC-20090924
Project: 1997-011-00 - Duck Valley Reservation Habitat Enhancement
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Approved Date: 10/23/2006
Recommendation: Fund
Comments:

Project Relationships: None

Name Role Organization
Buster Gibson Interested Party Shoshone-Paiute Tribes
Peter Lofy Supervisor Bonneville Power Administration
Jenna Peterson Interested Party Bonneville Power Administration
Christopher Cleveland Project Lead Shoshone-Paiute Tribes
Jinwon Seo Supervisor Shoshone-Paiute Tribes
Rob Shull Env. Compliance Lead Bonneville Power Administration
Cecilia Brown Project Manager Bonneville Power Administration