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Project Summary

Project 2000-026-00 - Rainwater Wildlife Area Operations
Project Number:
2000-026-00
Title:
Rainwater Wildlife Area Operations
Summary:
The 11,000 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was established in September 1998 by the CTUIR under the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program and Washington Interim Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (BPA et al., 1993) to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife impacted by development of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric dams. The project is located in the upper South Fork Touchet River drainage in the Walla Walla River Subbasin approximately 8 miles south of Dayton, Washington adjacent to the Umatilla National Forest. The area was selected by the CTUIR and BPA as a regional mitigation project because of its large size, location in the upper headwaters of the Touchet River watershed, and ability of the area to provide anadromous fish, resident fish, and wildlife benefits in a watershed context.

The Wildlife Area is located in southeastern Washington in Township 7 North, Range 39 East, all or portions of Sections 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9; and Township 8 North, Range 39 East, all or portions of Sections 5, 8, 9, 17, 19, 20, 21, 27, 28, 29, 31, 32, 33, and 34, Willamette Meridian, Latitude 46.12.30, Longitude 117.57.30.

The goal of this contract is to help Bonneville Power Administration meet its' Columbia River Basin mitigation obligation within the Ceded Lands of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The contract will provide funding to the CTUIR to administer the Rainwater Wildlife Area, and maintain, protect, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat. Targeted habitat types include riparian, native grasslands, and upland forest.

The project area includes approximately 7,000 acres of upland and riparian coniferous forest, 1,500 acres of native and native-like grasslands, and 180 acres of deciduous riparian habitat. The Wildlife Area also provides 10 miles of headwater spawning and rearing habitat for Threatened summer steelhead and bull trout, and resident trout. The project provides 5,161 baseline Habitat Units (HU's) and an estimated 1,500 enhancement HU's for seven target mitigation species.
Proposer:
None
Proponent Orgs:
Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR) (Tribe)
Starting FY:
2000
Ending FY:
2032
BPA PM:
Stage:
Implementation - Project Status Report
Area:
Province Subbasin %
Columbia Plateau Walla Walla 100.00%
Purpose:
Habitat
Emphasis:
Restoration/Protection
Focal Species:
All Anadromous Fish
All Anadromous Salmonids
Bass, Largemouth
Bass, Smallmouth
Chinook - Mid-Columbia River Spring ESU
Chinook - Snake River Spring/Summer ESU (threatened)
Freshwater Mussels
Lamprey, Pacific
Lamprey, Western Brook
OBSOLETE-Carp, Common
OBSOLETE-Catfish
OBSOLETE-Crappie, Black
OBSOLETE-Crappie, White
OBSOLETE-Perch, Yellow
OBSOLETE-Pikeminnow, Northern
OBSOLETE-Trout, Brown
Steelhead - Middle Columbia River DPS (threatened)
Steelhead - Snake River DPS (threatened)
Trout, Bull (threatened)
Trout, Interior Redband
Trout, Rainbow
Whitefish, Mountain
Wildlife
Species Benefit:
Anadromous: 0.0%   Resident: 0.0%   Wildlife: 100.0%
Special:
None
BiOp Association:

Cover photo

Figure Name: Cover

Document ID: P121333

Document: Rainwater Wildlife Area 2010 Year End Report

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 51890

Transect D before grazing. Yellow starthistle is visible as the yellow flower in the photograph.

Figure Name: Figure 1

Document ID: P121333

Document: Rainwater Wildlife Area 2010 Year End Report

Page Number: 15

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 51890

Transect D after grazing. The goats appeared to have eaten all of the yellow starthistle, but left the grasses.

Figure Name: Figure 2

Document ID: P121333

Document: Rainwater Wildlife Area 2010 Year End Report

Page Number: 15

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 51890

Rainwater Location within CTUIR Ceded Territory

Figure Name: Map 1

Document ID: P118096

Document: 2009 Rainwater Annual Report

Page Number: 10

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 45793

Rainwater Wildlife Area Vicinity

Figure Name: Map 2

Document ID: P118096

Document: 2009 Rainwater Annual Report

Page Number: 11

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 45793

Map of the new addition (Gallatin Tract) to Rainwater Wildlife Area in 2009.

Figure Name: Map 3

Document ID: P118096

Document: 2009 Rainwater Annual Report

Page Number: 19

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 45793

No caption provided.

Figure Name: Photo 1

Document ID: P118096

Document: 2009 Rainwater Annual Report

Page Number: 21

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 45793

No caption provided.

Figure Name: Photo 2

Document ID: P118096

Document: 2009 Rainwater Annual Report

Page Number: 21

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 45793

No caption provided.

Figure Name: Photo 3

Document ID: P118096

Document: 2009 Rainwater Annual Report

Page Number: 21

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 45793

South Fork Touchet River Road Relocation and Obliteration

Figure Name: Map 4

Document ID: P118096

Document: 2009 Rainwater Annual Report

Page Number: 22

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 45793

No caption provided.

Figure Name: Photo 4

Document ID: P118096

Document: 2009 Rainwater Annual Report

Page Number: 22

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 45793

No caption provided.

Figure Name: Photo 5

Document ID: P118096

Document: 2009 Rainwater Annual Report

Page Number: 22

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 45793

2009 Planting Units

Figure Name: Map 5

Document ID: P118096

Document: 2009 Rainwater Annual Report

Page Number: 23

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 45793

No caption provided.

Figure Name: Photo 6

Document ID: P118096

Document: 2009 Rainwater Annual Report

Page Number: 38

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 45793

Juvenile Fish Index Sampling Sites

Figure Name: Map 9

Document ID: P118096

Document: 2009 Rainwater Annual Report

Page Number: 41

Project: 2000-026-00

Contract: 45793


Summary of Budgets

To view all expenditures for all fiscal years, click "Project Exp. by FY"

Expense SOY Budget Working Budget Contracted Amount Modified Contract Amount Expenditures *
FY2016 (Previous) $381,713 $381,713 $465,735 $465,735 $459,024

Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla $381,713 $465,735 $465,735 $459,024
FY2017 (Current) $375,629 $375,629 $430,391 $430,391 $350,165

Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla $375,629 $430,391 $430,391 $350,165
FY2018 (Next) $350,900 $350,900 $350,900 $350,900 $0

Post 2018 – Umatilla $350,900 $350,900 $350,900 $0
Capital SOY Budget Working Budget Contracted Amount Modified Contract Amount Expenditures *
FY2016 (Previous) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla $0 $0 $0 $0
FY2017 (Current) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla $0 $0 $0 $0
FY2018 (Next) $0 $0 $0 $0

* Expenditures data includes accruals and are based on data through 31-Aug-2017

Decided Budget Transfers  (FY2016 - FY2018)

Acct FY Acct Type Amount Fund Budget Decision Date
FY2016 Capital $250,000 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Fish Accord Review 05/02/2008
FY2016 Capital $250,000 To: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla CTUIR 2000-026-00 change funding from Capital to Expense in FY2008-2017 11/30/2009
FY2016 Expense $300,000 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Fish Accord Review 05/02/2008
FY2016 Expense $56,606 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Fish Accord project COLA 11/21/2008
FY2016 Expense $10,698 To: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Establish CTUIR FY13-17 Admin Budget (2012-010-00) 07/19/2012
FY2016 Expense $35,805 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla CTUIR (FY13 budget cleanup) 10/03/2013
FY2017 Capital $250,000 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Fish Accord Review 05/02/2008
FY2017 Capital $250,000 To: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla CTUIR 2000-026-00 change funding from Capital to Expense in FY2008-2017 11/30/2009
FY2017 Expense $300,000 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Fish Accord Review 05/02/2008
FY2017 Expense $65,521 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Fish Accord project COLA 11/21/2008
FY2017 Expense $10,527 To: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Establish CTUIR FY12 Admin Budget (2012-010-00) 01/26/2012
FY2017 Expense $10,966 To: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Establish CTUIR FY13-17 Admin Budget (2012-010-00) 07/19/2012
FY2017 Expense $35,805 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla CTUIR (FY13 budget cleanup) 10/03/2013
FY2017 Expense $4,204 To: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Add funding to CTUIR FY17 Admin Budget (2012-010-00) 02/24/2016
FY2018 Expense $365,521 From: Post 2018 – Umatilla FY18 Initial Planning Budgets (WS, CTUIR, YN, CRITFC) 7/18/2017 07/18/2017
FY2018 Expense $14,621 To: Post 2018 – Umatilla CTUIR Establish FY18 budget for 2012-010-00 Accord Administration 08/21/2017

Pending Budget Decision?  No


Project Cost Share:

FY2016 0 %
FY2015 2 %
FY2014 28 %
FY2013 30 %
FY2012 0 %
FY2011 1 %
FY2010 0 %
FY2009 0 %
FY2008 0 %
FY2007 2 %
Fiscal Year Cost Share Partner Total Proposed
Contribution
Total Confirmed
Contribution
FY2015 Washington Department of Ecology $12,000

Contracts

The table below contains contracts with the following statuses: Active, Complete, History, Issued.
Expense Contracts:
Number Contractor Name Title Status Contracted Amount Dates
25792 SOW Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR) 2000-026-00 PL RAINWATER WILDLIFE AREA History $504,926 1/1/2006 - 6/30/2007
30883 SOW Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR) 2000-026-00 PL RAINWATER WILDLIFE AREA OPERATIONS History $300,000 1/1/2007 - 12/31/2007
BPA-004794 Bonneville Power Administration Gallatin/Colter Ridge Properties-Appraisal 2009 Active $122 10/1/2008 - 9/30/2009
BPA-005058 Bonneville Power Administration FY10 Rainwater Wildlife Active $2,126,496 10/1/2009 - 9/30/2010
BPA-005507 Bonneville Power Administration Rainwater Wildlife Active $12,254 10/1/2010 - 9/30/2011
BPA-006200 Bonneville Power Administration Rainwater Wildlife Active $0 10/1/2011 - 9/30/2012
72948 SOW Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR) 2000-026-00 EXP RAINWATER WILDLIFE AREA: OPERATIONS & ENHANCEMENT Issued $465,735 7/1/2016 - 6/30/2017
73982 REL 20 SOW Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR) 2000-026-00 EXP RAINWATER WILDLIFE AREA: OPERATIONS & ENHANCEMENT Issued $430,391 7/1/2017 - 6/30/2018



Annual Progress Reports
Expected (since FY2004):11
Completed:10
On time:10
Status Reports
Completed:49
On time:19
Avg Days Late:5

Earliest Subsequent           Accepted Count of Contract Deliverables
Contract Contract(s) Title Contractor Start End Status Reports Complete Green Yellow Red Total % Green and Complete Canceled
25792 30883, 36442, 41589, 45793, 51890, 58367, 61680, 65632, 69400, 72948, 73982 REL 20 2000-026-00 PL RAINWATER WILDLIFE AREA Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR) 01/2006 01/2006 Issued 49 148 0 0 4 152 97.37% 9
BPA-004794 Gallatin/Colter Ridge Properties-Appraisal 2009 Bonneville Power Administration 10/2008 10/2008 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-005058 FY10 Rainwater Wildlife Bonneville Power Administration 10/2009 10/2009 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-005507 Rainwater Wildlife Bonneville Power Administration 10/2010 10/2010 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Project Totals 49 148 0 0 4 152 97.37% 9


Review: Wildlife Category Review

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 2000-026-00-ISRP-20090618
Project: 2000-026-00 - Rainwater Wildlife Area Operations
Review: Wildlife Category Review
Completed Date: 5/19/2009
Final Round ISRP Date: None
Final Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria
Final Round ISRP Comment:
The protection and enhancement of these habitats at the Rainwater project area makes a significant contribution to the ecological health of the subbasin. In addition, the stream habitat within the project area has been identified as high priority for steelhead and Chinook salmon in the subbasin plan. This project is one of the few that includes efforts to assess the response of fish and wildlife populations to habitat restoration. The M&E effort for the Rainwater Wildlife Area is generally well-designed. The effort should provide adequate information on the habitat and population responses to restoration efforts at the project site. There are a few areas where improvements in the M&E effort should be implemented (see below).

1. Technical Justification, Program Significance and Consistency, and Project Relationships
The project sponsors provide a strong technical justification for this project. Habitat types represented on the project area, including grasslands and riparian wetlands, are poorly represented in the Walla Walla Subbasin as a whole due to human activities. Very few of the remaining areas that do support these habitat types are protected. Therefore, the protection and enhancement of these habitats at the Rainwater project area makes a significant contribution to the ecological health of the subbasin. In addition, the stream habitat within the project area has been identified as high priority for steelhead and Chinook salmon in the subbasin plan. There was a bit of confusion regarding the priority of the project streams for steelhead and Chinook in the Technical Justification section. The authors indicate that stream reaches in the project area were prioritized as 12th for steelhead and 15th for Chinook out of 47 stream reaches in the subbasin (page 2 of narrative). But in the following sentence they indicate that the priority ratings were 10th for steelhead and 3rd for Chinook. Either rating establishes the significance of the aquatic habitats at the Rainwater project area, but this seeming discrepancy should be resolved.

The Rainwater Wildlife Area Project is closely linked with other projects in the subbasin and takes advantage of some subbasin-scale monitoring programs to generate information relevant to the effectiveness of the restoration measures being implemented at Rainwater. In particular, the linkage with the Walla Walla Basin Natural Fish Production and Monitoring and Evaluation Project provides very complete information on the response of salmonid fishes to restoration at the Rainwater Wildlife Area.

2. Project History and Results
Significant progress has been made in expanding and enhancing habitat at the Rainwater Project Area since its establishment in 1998. The evolution of the project since its inception is clearly presented in this section.

3. Objectives, Work Elements, and Methods
The Objectives, Work Elements and Methods are appropriate for this project. Most activities are focused on the maintenance of the area and implementation of new habitat enhancement measures (especially related to the improvement of upland habitats). But the objectives and methods for the M&E program also are well designed.

A large part of the work is devoted to project management and administration. The sponsors should continue to investigate new techniques to accomplish, reduce, or eliminate maintenance and administrative tasks over the long term. Note that in work element 11, methods of biological monitoring and evaluation, were not provided.

4. M&E
The M&E effort for the Rainwater Wildlife Area is generally well-designed. The effort should provide adequate information on the habitat and population responses to restoration efforts at the project site. HEP measurements are augmented with supplemental measurements of habitat and vegetation response to restoration treatments, constituting effectiveness monitoring. These data should provide a relatively good picture of changes in habitat quality over time. In addition, this project is one of the few that includes an effort to assess the response of fish and wildlife populations to habitat restoration.

There are a few areas where improvements in the M&E effort should be implemented.

1) Stream habitat surveys were conducted in 1999-2000 but have not been repeated. A new habitat survey is planned for 2009-2010. More frequent habitat assessments would provide a more sensitive gauge of habitat response to restoration efforts. These surveys do not have to be annual but they should be repeated at least every five years and after major disturbance events. A repeat survey after the 2006 fire would have been informative.

2) Annual monitoring of juvenile fish populations is an M&E element that is very rarely included in project M&E plans. Its inclusion in this project is a real strength of the M&E effort for aquatic habitats. The inclusion of juvenile index sites outside the project area in 2004 will provide some context for interpreting annual changes in fish abundance at the index sites in the project area. However, it appears that the index sites are not sampled consistently. The data presented in Table 4 indicates that some index sites within the project area are sampled in one year and a different set sampled the next year. These data also suggest that the "control" reaches outside the project area were only sampled in 2004. The primary purpose for collecting these data is to determine if there is a temporal trend in fish populations. Therefore, the same set of reaches should be sampled each year (or on some consistent schedule) and the "control" reaches should be sampled on this same schedule. It is not noted in the narrative whether habitat restoration projects have been implemented at any of the juvenile abundance index sites. If not, one or two sites where projects have been implemented should be added.
First Round ISRP Date: 3/26/2009
First Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria
First Round ISRP Comment:
The protection and enhancement of these habitats at the Rainwater project area makes a significant contribution to the ecological health of the subbasin. In addition, the stream habitat within the project area has been identified as high priority for steelhead and Chinook salmon in the subbasin plan. This project is one of the few that includes efforts to assess the response of fish and wildlife populations to habitat restoration. The M&E effort for the Rainwater Wildlife Area is generally well-designed. The effort should provide adequate information on the habitat and population responses to restoration efforts at the project site. There are a few areas where improvements in the M&E effort should be implemented (see below).

1. Technical Justification, Program Significance and Consistency, and Project Relationships
The project sponsors provide a strong technical justification for this project. Habitat types represented on the project area, including grasslands and riparian wetlands, are poorly represented in the Walla Walla Subbasin as a whole due to human activities. Very few of the remaining areas that do support these habitat types are protected. Therefore, the protection and enhancement of these habitats at the Rainwater project area makes a significant contribution to the ecological health of the subbasin. In addition, the stream habitat within the project area has been identified as high priority for steelhead and Chinook salmon in the subbasin plan. There was a bit of confusion regarding the priority of the project streams for steelhead and Chinook in the Technical Justification section. The authors indicate that stream reaches in the project area were prioritized as 12th for steelhead and 15th for Chinook out of 47 stream reaches in the subbasin (page 2 of narrative). But in the following sentence they indicate that the priority ratings were 10th for steelhead and 3rd for Chinook. Either rating establishes the significance of the aquatic habitats at the Rainwater project area, but this seeming discrepancy should be resolved.

The Rainwater Wildlife Area Project is closely linked with other projects in the subbasin and takes advantage of some subbasin-scale monitoring programs to generate information relevant to the effectiveness of the restoration measures being implemented at Rainwater. In particular, the linkage with the Walla Walla Basin Natural Fish Production and Monitoring and Evaluation Project provides very complete information on the response of salmonid fishes to restoration at the Rainwater Wildlife Area.

2. Project History and Results
Significant progress has been made in expanding and enhancing habitat at the Rainwater Project Area since its establishment in 1998. The evolution of the project since its inception is clearly presented in this section.

3. Objectives, Work Elements, and Methods
The Objectives, Work Elements and Methods are appropriate for this project. Most activities are focused on the maintenance of the area and implementation of new habitat enhancement measures (especially related to the improvement of upland habitats). But the objectives and methods for the M&E program also are well designed.

A large part of the work is devoted to project management and administration. The sponsors should continue to investigate new techniques to accomplish, reduce, or eliminate maintenance and administrative tasks over the long term. Note that in work element 11, methods of biological monitoring and evaluation, were not provided.

4. M&E
The M&E effort for the Rainwater Wildlife Area is generally well-designed. The effort should provide adequate information on the habitat and population responses to restoration efforts at the project site. HEP measurements are augmented with supplemental measurements of habitat and vegetation response to restoration treatments, constituting effectiveness monitoring. These data should provide a relatively good picture of changes in habitat quality over time. In addition, this project is one of the few that includes an effort to assess the response of fish and wildlife populations to habitat restoration.

There are a few areas where improvements in the M&E effort should be implemented.

1) Stream habitat surveys were conducted in 1999-2000 but have not been repeated. A new habitat survey is planned for 2009-2010. More frequent habitat assessments would provide a more sensitive gauge of habitat response to restoration efforts. These surveys do not have to be annual but they should be repeated at least every 5 years and after major disturbance events. A repeat survey after the 2006 fire would have been informative.

2) Annual monitoring of juvenile fish populations is an M&E element that is very rarely included in project M&E plans. Its inclusion in this project is a real strength of the M&E effort for aquatic habitats. The inclusion of juvenile index sites outside the project area in 2004 will provide some context for interpreting annual changes in fish abundance at the index sites in the project area. However, it appears that the index sites are not sampled consistently. The data presented in Table 4 indicates that some index sites within the project area are sampled in one year and a different set sampled the next year. These data also suggest that the "control" reaches outside the project area were only sampled in 2004. The primary purpose for collecting these data is to determine if there is a temporal trend in fish populations. Therefore, the same set of reaches should be sampled each year (or on some consistent schedule) and the "control" reaches should be sampled on this same schedule. It is not noted in the narrative whether habitat restoration projects have been implemented at any of the juvenile abundance index sites. If not, one or two sites where projects have been implemented should be added.
Documentation Links:

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 2000-026-00-NPCC-20091217
Project: 2000-026-00 - Rainwater Wildlife Area Operations
Review: Wildlife Category Review
Approved Date: 5/31/2009
Recommendation: Fund
Comments: Accord Project. Programmatic issue # 2-3
Conditions:
Council Condition #1 Programmatic Issue: Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) - interaction between wildlife crediting and monitoring
Council Condition #2 Programmatic Issue: Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) participation funding
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review

Legal Assessment (In-Lieu)

Assessment Number: 2000-026-00-INLIEU-20090521
Project Number: 2000-026-00
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 10/6/2006
In Lieu Rating: No Problems Exist
Cost Share Rating: None
Comment: O&M on BPA-funded wildlife mitigation site; assume requested funds consistent with terms of MOA.

Capital Assessment

Assessment Number: 2000-026-00-CAPITAL-20090618
Project Number: 2000-026-00
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 2/27/2007
Capital Rating: Does Not Qualify for Capital Funding
Capital Asset Category: None
Comment: None

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 2000-026-00-ISRP-20060831
Project: 2000-026-00 - Rainwater Wildlife Area Operations
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 8/31/2006
Final Round ISRP Date: None
Final Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria
Final Round ISRP Comment:
This proposal meets the ISRP review criteria and benefits wildlife. The ISRP, however, suggests that the sponsor address the following comments to improve the project, but the ISRP does not need to see responses to these comments.

The authors could improve the wildlife monitoring portion of this work by more clearly identifying the variables they will use to measure progress. Specifically, the authors could improve the monitoring and evaluation section by more clearly describing the location and placement of vegetation transects, number of vegetation transects, and measurements they will take on these transects. The authors should more clearly identify which bird species (or will they focus only on bird species listed in proposal) that will be recorded on these transects. The authors should more clearly identify the history behind the selection of mitigation bird species (narrative, p.4) and whether or not the species will be monitored and evaluated.

The authors could improve their discussion of bird surveys by identifying why transects will be used only in grassland cover. The ISRP wondered why birds are not surveyed in other cover types. The authors could improve their presentation of monitoring and evaluation of weed control efforts by quantifying weed distribution and abundance pre- and post-treatment with herbicides.

The authors could more directly communicate where past data are located.
Documentation Links:

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 2000-026-00-NPCC-20090924
Project: 2000-026-00 - Rainwater Wildlife Area Operations
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Approved Date: 10/23/2006
Recommendation: Fund
Comments: Interim funding pending wildlife o&m review.

Project Relationships: None

Name Role Organization
Allen Childs Technical Contact Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR)
Peter Lofy Supervisor Bonneville Power Administration
Gerald Middel Project Lead Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR)
Linda Jones Administrative Contact Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR)
Andre L'Heureux Project Manager Bonneville Power Administration
Lindsay Chiono Technical Contact Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR)
Carl Scheeler Supervisor Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR)
Dan Gambetta Env. Compliance Lead Bonneville Power Administration
Eric Hoverson Technical Contact Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR)