Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program
RSS Feed for updates to Project 2002-073-00 - Wallowa Culvert Inventory Follow this via RSS feed. Help setting up RSS feeds?

Project Summary

Project 2002-073-00 - Wallowa Culvert Inventory
Project Number:
2002-073-00
Title:
Wallowa Culvert Inventory
Summary:
The primary objective is to determine the extent of fish passage issues within Wallowa County. The collection of this data will include a quantitative and qualitative assessment of passage. Upon completion of this inventory, data will be entered into a database and used to assess and prioritize rehabilitation work. At that point in time, fish passage and connectivity can be evaluated at the watershed scale. The second objective is to use this information to prioritize the barrier structures for replacement consideration at the watershed scale, hence allowing resource managers to spend limited resources in the most efficient manner.
Proposer:
None
Proponent Orgs:
Nez Perce Tribe (Tribe)
Starting FY:
2002
Ending FY:
2006
BPA PM:
Stage:
Area:
Province Subbasin %
Blue Mountain Grande Ronde 100.00%
Purpose:
Habitat
Emphasis:
Restoration/Protection
Focal Species:
Chinook - Snake River Spring/Summer ESU
Lamprey, Pacific
Other Resident
Steelhead - Snake River DPS
Trout, Bull
Whitefish, Mountain
Species Benefit:
Anadromous: 100.0%   Resident: 0.0%   Wildlife: 0.0%
Tags:
None
Special:
None
BiOp Association:
None

Description: Page: 12 Figure 1: Traditional use area of the Nimi'ipuu.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 720 x 540

Description: Page: 13 Figure 2: The Nez Perce Tribe's Territory.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 814 x 627

Description: Page: 16 Figure 3: The general characteristics and land management patterns in Wallowa County, Oregon.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 18 Figure 4: The major streams and roads in Wallowa County, Oregon.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 19 Figure 5: The major watersheds of Wallowa County, Oregon.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 21 Figure 6: Wal' a wa Watershed general characteristics.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 23 Figure 7: Lostine River watershed general characteristics.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 25 Figure 8: General characteristics of the Minam River Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 27 Figure 9: General characteristics of the Wa-wey-mai Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 29 Figure 10: General characteristics of the Win' a ha Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 31 Figure 11: Toynima Watershed characteristics.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 33 Figure 12: The general characteristics of the Snake River Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 35 Figure 13: The general features of the Imnaha River Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 37 Figure 14: The general characteristics of the Big Sheep Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 48 Photo 1: This picture clearly illustrates some of the unique structure types surveyed. This particular photograph shows a concrete box bridge. There is also a point of diversion at this structure.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 49 Photo 2: The picture on the left illustrates a simple ford that was inventoried. Again, these structures were assumed to pass all life history stages of all species, unless otherwise noted.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 49 Photo 3: The photograph on the right illustrates a concrete-bottom bridge structure. This particular structure has an associated outlet drop.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 540 x 405

Description: Page: 49 Photo 4: “The view” from inside the circular culvert looking at the “outside world” was rather unique. The circular corrugated metal pipe depicted in this photograph was the most commonly inventoried pipe.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 50 Photo 5: The picture to the left illustrates a common outlet drop associated with an undersized, circular culvert. This culvert is located on the East Fork of Broady Creek.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 50 Photo 6a: Two additional pictures of typical outlet drop. The photograph on the left is a circular culvert, while the picture on the right is a squashed-pipe arch structure.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 480 x 640

Description: Page: 50 Photo 6b: Two additional pictures of typical outlet drop. The photograph on the left is a circular culvert, while the picture on the right is a squashed-pipe arch structure.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 480 x 640

Description: Page: 51 Photo 7: This photograph shows a multiple pipe. These structures are also circular. During the course of this project, there were up to five side-by-side structures inventoried.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 51 Photo 8: The picture on the right illustrates multiple culverts at one location, all of which were undersized.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 51 Photo 9: The photograph on the left illustrates an open-bottom arch culvert. This specific structure contains deposition within the culvert along the left portion of the photograph. This has caused increased scour on the opposite side of the structure. Although this type of culvert is generally better in terms of aquatic species passage, often they were undersized structures when they were installed. The date on this picture is incorrect.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 480 x 640

Description: Page: 52 Photo 10: The second most common structure type is depicted in the picture on the right, the squashed-pipe arch. This particular structure also contains baffles.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 480 x 640

Description: Page: 52 Photo 11: The picture on the left illustrates a typical example of some of the retrofits that were encountered. Originally, there was a bridge (foreground) with a one lane road. Two side-by-side culverts were inserted into the inlet of the bridge to accommodate a two lane highway.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 53 Photo 12: Due to this culvert being undersized, a large scour pool was created at the outlet. The “solution” to this situation was the addition of this baffled structure onto the outlet of this culvert. The date on this picture is incorrect.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 54 Photo 13: This photograph shows a very unique “other” survey in Wallowa County. This picture depicts Wallowa Lake Dam. Although this was not a road/stream crossing, it is apparent that there isn’t any consideration of cuy’ em passage at this facility. It is also obvious that no passage for any species is possible at this structure, as the dam is approximately thirty-five feet high.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 544 x 728

Description: Page: 55 Photo 14a: These two photographs depict a handmade dam with adult Chinook on a redd, just upstream of the structure. In the foreground of the picture of the two adults, the handmade dam is visible. The break shown in the middle of the dam was created by the surveyors.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 525 x 394

Description: Page: 55 Photo 14b: These two photographs depict a handmade dam with adult Chinook on a redd, just upstream of the structure. In the foreground of the picture of the two adults, the handmade dam is visible. The break shown in the middle of the dam was created by the surveyors.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 507 x 380

Description: Page: 55 Photo 15: This picture shows a typical trash rack at the inlet of a culvert that is in dire need of maintenance. Trash racks were not that uncommon in Wallowa County. At this specific structure, the culvert is also undersized. Therefore, this culvert should be replaced, rather than simply performing maintenance on the trash rack.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 56 Photo 16a: The group of three pictures here illustrates typical irrigation diversion structures. These structures ranged from creating some passage issues to totally impassable.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 56 Photo 16b: The group of three pictures here illustrates typical irrigation diversion structures. These structures ranged from creating some passage issues to totally impassable.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 57 Photo 17a: The photograph on the right illustrates both an irrigation diversion and a handmade dam. The picture on the left was an adult Chinook that was trapped between the diversion and the dam.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 638 x 477

Description: Page: 57 Photo 17b: The photograph on the right illustrates both an irrigation diversion and a handmade dam. The picture on the left was an adult Chinook that was trapped between the diversion and the dam.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 571 x 427

Description: Page: 57 Photo 18: This photograph depicts a cuy’ em ladder around an irrigation diversion. This is typical of cuy’ em ladders currently located within Wallowa County. The average drop associated with each of these steps was measured to be one foot. As per this protocol, this constitutes a barrier to both juvenile and adult life history stages.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 441 x 589

Description: Page: 58 Photo 19a: The two pictures above show the weir located on the Lostine River. This weir is used to collect adult Chinook as part of the supplementation program.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 58 Photo 19b: The two pictures above show the weir located on the Lostine River. This weir is used to collect adult Chinook as part of the supplementation program.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 58 Photo 20: This is a photograph of the “Gumboot” weir structure on the Imnaha River. The weir is not in operation in this picture. It is installed along the two tracks shown spanning the structure (permanently installed in the concrete). In addition to the velocity barrier this concrete creates, the two rails also create passage obstacles (at least for juvenile migration).

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 60 Figure 15: All surveys conducted within Wallowa County.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 64 Figure 16: All of the quantitatively only assessed barriers in Wallowa County.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 66 Figure 17: All of the qualitatively only assessed barrier structures in Wallowa County.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 69 Figure 18: All of the non-stream/road crossing sites within Wallowa County.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 71 Photo 21: The picture to the left shows a typical dewatered section of stream. This is an example from Hurricane Creek. Even though there is a trickle of water clearly shown in this photograph, this is obviously a physical barrier at this time of year. Early in the season, this section first becomes a thermal barrier when flows begin to drop.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 517 x 388

Description: Page: 72 Figure 19: Anthropogenic caused low flow sections of six streams in Wallowa County effecting cuy’ em passage.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 74 Figure 20: Areas not surveyed within Wallowa County.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 76 Figure 21: Sites in the Toynima Watershed that underwent hydraulic analysis using FishXing software.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 79 Figure 22: All of the prioritized barriers within the west half of the Wal' a wa Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 80 Figure 23: All of the prioritized barriers within the east half of the Wal' a wa Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 82 Figure 24: Wal' a wa Watershed first three barriers encountered.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 84 Figure 25: Wal' a wa Watershed first barriers only.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 86 Figure 26: Wal' a wa second barriers only.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 89 Figure 27: Wal' a wa Watershed third barriers only.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 95 Figure 28: All of the Lostine River Watershed barriers.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 99 Figure 29: All of the barrier stream crossings in the Wa-wey-mai Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 103 Figure 30: All of the prioritized barriers located within the Toynima Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 106 Figure 31: Toynima Watershed prioritized first barriers only.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 108 Photo 22: This picture illustrates the almost complete lack of flow for site J150. There is some low shown in the foreground of this photograph.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 627 x 471

Description: Page: 110 Figure 32: Toynima Watershed prioritized second barriers only.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 114 Figure 33: All of the barriers assessed in the Imnaha River Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 118 Figure 34: All of the barrier crossings assessed in the Big Sheep Creek Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 119 Figure 35: All of the first three barriers surveyed within the Big Sheep Creek Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 121 Photo 23a: The above two pictures illustrate the Little Sheep Facility. Cuy’ em passage is limited to the navigation of these two structures. As one can see from the photograph on the right, even if the cuy’ em are able to jump onto the concrete slab, they would then have to be capable of swimming the distance to the “inlet” of this structure.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 121 Photo 23b: The above two pictures illustrate the Little Sheep Facility. Cuy’ em passage is limited to the navigation of these two structures. As one can see from the photograph on the right, even if the cuy’ em are able to jump onto the concrete slab, they would then have to be capable of swimming the distance to the “inlet” of this structure.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 123 Photo 24a: The picture on the top left clearly shows the channelized section downstream of the culvert. The photograph on the bottom left illustrates a portion of the channelized stream reach upstream of the culvert. However, the channelized section of stream upstream of the culvert extends for a measured ¼ mile section of stream. Obviously, this was done in an attempt to keep the stream aligned with the structure.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 123 Photo 24b: The picture on the top left clearly shows the channelized section downstream of the culvert. The photograph on the bottom left illustrates a portion of the channelized stream reach upstream of the culvert. However, the channelized section of stream upstream of the culvert extends for a measured ¼ mile section of stream. Obviously, this was done in an attempt to keep the stream aligned with the structure.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 640 x 480

Description: Page: 126 Figure 36: The Wallowa Valley Improvement Canal.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 127 Photo 25: This picture clearly shows Redmont Creek flowing into the canal. There is obviously no passage consideration into Little Sheep Creek. This is typical of the streams in the upper portion of the Little Sheep drainage.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 450 x 338

Description: Page: 128 Figure 37: Comparative ranked priorities for all of the first three crossings in the Big Sheep Creek Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 135 Figure 38: All of the currently open and blocked habitat within Wallowa County, Oregon.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 816 x 1056

Description: Page: 139 Figure 39: The group of high priority replacement candidates in the west half of the Wal' a wa Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 141 Figure 40: The group of high priority replacement candidates in the east half of the Wal' a wa Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210

Description: Page: 146 Figure 41: The group of high priority replacement candidates in the Big Sheep Creek Watershed.

Project: 2002-073-00

Document: P102663

Dimensions: 935 x 1210


Summary of Budgets

To view all expenditures for all fiscal years, click "Project Exp. by FY"

To see more detailed project budget information, please visit the "Project Budget" page

No Decided Budget Transfers

Pending Budget Decision?  No


Actual Project Cost Share

Current Fiscal Year — 2021
Cost Share Partner Total Proposed Contribution Total Confirmed Contribution
There are no project cost share contributions to show.
Previous Fiscal Years
Fiscal Year Total Contributions % of Budget
There are no cost share summaries to display from previous years.

Contracts

The table below contains contracts with the following statuses: Active, Complete, History, Issued.
* "Total Contracted Amount" column includes contracted amount from both capital and expense components of the contract.
Expense Contracts:
Number Contractor Name Title Status Total Contracted Amount Dates
27840 SOW Nez Perce Tribe 2002 073 00 WALLOWA CULVERT INVENTORY History $175,517 6/1/2006 - 6/30/2007



Annual Progress Reports
Expected (since FY2004):2
Completed:2
On time:2
Status Reports
Completed:8
On time:6
Avg Days Early:3

Earliest Subsequent           Accepted Count of Contract Deliverables
Contract Contract(s) Title Contractor Start End Status Reports Complete Green Yellow Red Total % Green and Complete Canceled
18175 27840 2002 073 00 WALLOWA COUNTY CULVERT INVENTORY Nez Perce Tribe 06/2004 06/2004 History 8 9 0 0 0 9 100.00% 0
Project Totals 8 9 0 0 0 9 100.00% 0


The table content is updated frequently and thus contains more recent information than what was in the original proposal reviewed by ISRP and Council.

No assessments are available for this project.
Project Relationships: None

Name Role Organization
Richard (NPT) Christian (Inactive) Project Lead Nez Perce Tribe
Dorothy Welch Project Manager Bonneville Power Administration
Emmit Taylor, Jr. Supervisor Nez Perce Tribe