Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program
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Project Summary

Project 2007-299-00 - Investigation of Relative Reproductive Success of Stray Hatchery & Wild Steelhead & Influence of Hatchery Strays on Natural Productivity in Deschutes
Project Number:
2007-299-00
Title:
Investigation of Relative Reproductive Success of Stray Hatchery & Wild Steelhead & Influence of Hatchery Strays on Natural Productivity in Deschutes
Summary:
This project proposal has three primary objectives: 1) determine the relative reproductive success of stray hatchery and wild steelhead; 2) determine the number of stray hatchery steelhead escaping into the Bakeoven and Buck Hollow creeks, and 3) compare measures of fitness and productivity of the wild population and introgressed population. Project objectives will be achieved by operating juvenile and adult migrant steelhead trapping facilities in Bakeoven (treatment) and Buck Hollow (control) creeks. Adult traps and weirs will be used to determine adult escapements, prevent hatchery steelhead from escaping into spawning areas in the treatment stream, and to collect life history data and genetic samples. Wild and hatchery steelhead would be allowed to escape into spawning areas in the control stream. Tissue will be collected from each adult passed above the weirs, and we will determine the multilocus genotype. Naturally produced juvenile offspring and naturally produced adult progeny returning to the creeks will be sampled and DNA typed. We will conduct pedigree reconstruction analysis to determine the relative reproductive success of each parent and relative reproductive success of hatchery and wild fish. Selected life history traits, downstream migrant population estimates, and other indices of fitness will be collected from downstream trapping facilities at both treatment and control streams. Buck Hollow and Bakeoven creeks were selected as study streams due to their close proximity to each other, similar basin size, geology, and land use. The two study streams are both significant spawning tributaries for wild Deschutes Eastside populations, and have very similar habitat characteristics and fishery resources. We selected pedigree analysis because it is the most definitive approach to determine relative reproductive success. We chose to conduct this work in the Deschutes because of the importance of Deschutes steelhead to the Mid Columbia ESU and the magnitude of the stray problem in the Deschutes Basin. Information provided from this study will have broad application relative to the impacts of strays on Mid-C steelhead natural populations including those in the John Day River Basin. This is a multi-genaration project that requires the tracking of information from parent to progeny for multiple spawning years.
Proposer:
None
Proponent Orgs:
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (Govt - State)
Starting FY:
2007
Ending FY:
2019
BPA PM:
Stage:
Implementation - Project Status Report
Area:
Province Subbasin %
Columbia Plateau Deschutes 100.00%
Purpose:
Programmatic
Emphasis:
RM and E
Focal Species:
Steelhead - Middle Columbia River DPS
Species Benefit:
Anadromous: 100.0%   Resident: 0.0%   Wildlife: 0.0%
Special:
None

Map of the Deschutes River basin. Samples for the present work were collected from weir traps at the mouth of Bakeoven Creek and Buck Hollow Creek.

Figure Name: Figure 1

Document ID: P124905

Document: Investigation of the Relative Reproductive Success of Hatchery and Wild Steelhead in the Deschutes River Basin; 12/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 23

Project: 2007-299-00

Contract: 54086


Summary of Budgets

To view all expenditures for all fiscal years, click "Project Exp. by FY"

Expense SOY Budget Working Budget Contracted Amount Modified Contract Amount Expenditures *
FY2018 (Previous) $209,857 $209,857 $208,816 $208,816 $206,289

BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) $209,857 $208,816 $208,816 $206,289
FY2019 (Current) $83,750 $83,750 $83,750 $83,750 $18,649

BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) $83,750 $83,750 $83,750 $18,649
FY2020 (Next) $0 $0 $0 $0

BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) $0 $0 $0 $0

* Expenditures data includes accruals and are based on data through 31-Oct-2018

Decided Budget Transfers  (FY2018 - FY2020)

Acct FY Acct Type Amount Fund Budget Decision Date
FY2018 Expense $209,857 From: BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) FY18 SOY Budgets 07/17/2017
FY2019 Expense $83,750 From: BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) FY19 Q1 Flat 07/30/2018

Pending Budget Decision?  No


Actual Project Cost Share

Current Fiscal Year — 2019
Cost Share Partner Total Proposed Contribution Total Confirmed Contribution
There are no project cost share contributions to show.
Previous Fiscal Years
Fiscal Year Total Contributions % of Budget
2016 (Draft)
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011

Contracts

The table below contains contracts with the following statuses: Active, Complete, History, Issued.
Expense Contracts:
Number Contractor Name Title Status Contracted Amount Dates
BPA-005267 Bonneville Power Administration PIT tags for Deschutes Hatchery Strays Active $15,009 10/1/2010 - 9/30/2011
BPA-006381 Bonneville Power Administration PIT tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Active $9,680 10/1/2011 - 9/30/2012
BPA-007030 Bonneville Power Administration PIT tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Active $8,399 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013
BPA-007740 Bonneville Power Administration PIT tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Active $4,633 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014
BPA-008401 Bonneville Power Administration PIT tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Active $3,755 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015
BPA-008950 Bonneville Power Administration PIT Tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Active $3,639 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016
BPA-009600 Bonneville Power Administration PIT Tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Active $1,824 10/1/2016 - 9/30/2017
BPA-010205 Bonneville Power Administration PIT Tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Active $3,816 10/1/2017 - 9/30/2018
74313 REL 20 SOW Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife 2007-299-00 EXP DESCHUTES HATCHERY STRAY STUDY Issued $205,000 2/1/2018 - 1/31/2019
CR-329087 SOW Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife 2007-299-00 EXP DESCHUTES HATCHERY STRAY STUDY Pending $83,750 2/1/2019 - 1/31/2020



Annual Progress Reports
Expected (since FY2004):7
Completed:7
On time:7
Status Reports
Completed:36
On time:21
Avg Days Late:5

Earliest Subsequent           Accepted Count of Contract Deliverables
Contract Contract(s) Title Contractor Start End Status Reports Complete Green Yellow Red Total % Green and Complete Canceled
48830 54086, 60985, 64292, 68278, 71580, 75975, 74313 REL 20 2007-299-00 EXP DESCHUTES HATCHERY STRAY STUDY Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife 08/2010 08/2010 Pending 36 70 8 0 1 79 98.73% 0
BPA-005267 PIT tags for Deschutes Hatchery Strays Bonneville Power Administration 10/2010 10/2010 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-006381 PIT tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Bonneville Power Administration 10/2011 10/2011 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-007030 PIT tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Bonneville Power Administration 10/2012 10/2012 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-007740 PIT tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Bonneville Power Administration 10/2013 10/2013 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-008401 PIT tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Bonneville Power Administration 10/2014 10/2014 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-008950 PIT Tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Bonneville Power Administration 10/2015 10/2015 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-009600 PIT Tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Bonneville Power Administration 10/2016 10/2016 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-010205 PIT Tags - Deschutes Hatchery Strays Bonneville Power Administration 10/2017 10/2017 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Project Totals 36 70 8 0 1 79 98.73% 0


The table content is updated frequently and thus contains more recent information than what was in the original proposal reviewed by ISRP and Council.

Review: RME / AP Category Review

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 2007-299-00-NPCC-20110124
Project: 2007-299-00 - Investigation of Relative Reproductive Success of Stray Hatchery & Wild Steelhead & Influence of Hatchery Strays on Natural Productivity in Deschutes
Review: RME / AP Category Review
Proposal: RMECAT-2007-299-00
Proposal State: Pending BPA Response
Approved Date: 6/10/2011
Recommendation: Fund (Qualified)
Comments: Implement with condition through FY 2014: Sponsor to address ISRP qualifications within two years. Implementation beyond 2014 based on ISRP and Council review of qualification response.
Conditions:
Council Condition #1 Qualification: In two years, the project proponents should provide a report on genotyping, success with the identification of stray hatchery fish, capture of adults and smolts in the target streams, and exclusion of hatchery adults in the target stream. At that time there needs to be a thorough presentation of the BACI experimental design to ensure it will be sufficient to evaluate genetic and demographic effects of straying.
Council Condition #2 Programmatic Issue: RMECAT #6 Research projects in general—.
Council Condition #3 Programmatic Issue: RMECAT #4 Hatchery Effectiveness—.

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 2007-299-00-ISRP-20101015
Project: 2007-299-00 - Investigation of Relative Reproductive Success of Stray Hatchery & Wild Steelhead & Influence of Hatchery Strays on Natural Productivity in Deschutes
Review: RME / AP Category Review
Proposal Number: RMECAT-2007-299-00
Completed Date: 12/17/2010
Final Round ISRP Date: 12/17/2010
Final Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria (Qualified)
Final Round ISRP Comment:
Qualification: In two years, the project proponents should provide a report on genotyping, success with the identification of stray hatchery fish, capture of adults and smolts in the target streams, and exclusion of hatchery adults in the target stream. At that time there needs to be a thorough presentation of the BACI experimental design to ensure it will be sufficient to evaluate genetic and demographic effects of straying.

The goal of this project is to measure the effects of stray hatchery steelhead, released from hatcheries in other subbasins with the Columbia River using a BACI manipulative experiment. These stray hatchery steelhead enter the Deschutes River, apparently to seek refuge in the cool water, and unknown numbers remain and spawn with wild Deschutes River steelhead. These data are critical because these hatchery steelhead routinely make up between 50% and 10 times the abundance of wild spawning steelhead, and the effects of this swamping are unknown.

The work is well planned, using proven methods, and has been refined several times through the proposal process. The results stand to help managers understand whether supplementation of steelhead in other parts of the Columbia River Basin can aid in sustaining and recovering wild stocks, or whether supplementation is another factor contributing to their demise through unanticipated effects that play out at long distances in other basins.

1. Purpose, Significance to Regional Programs, Technical Background, and Objectives

The investigators propose to evaluate the relative reproductive success (RRS) of stray hatchery and wild steelhead in two eastside tributaries of the Deschutes River, and to remove hatchery strays from a treatment stream and compare the RRS of these wild steelhead to those in a control stream (see comments on the experimental design in number 4 below).

The proposal is of great significance to regional programs. The effects of these strays could threaten the wild stocks of mid-Columbia steelhead, which are a threatened DPS, with extinction, when added to other stressors like climate change. Moreover, no comprehensive evaluation has yet been made of the effects of stray hatchery steelhead on wild fish.

The investigators have carefully planned a decade-long project, tested the adult traps, and include a conservation geneticist who is skilled in parentage analysis from another project (on Abernathy Creek, WA).

The objectives and methods are reasonable, the general design simple and elegant, and the data collection and analysis well planned (including power analysis). If anything, it would be ideal (if funding were available) to add another set of treatment and control tributaries, perhaps westside tributaries. This would make another statistical “block” which could be compared with the eastside block to determine whether any effects are stronger or weaker between these two environments.


2. History: Accomplishments, Results, and Adaptive Management

This is a new project, so there are no accomplishments or results to report, except the pilot testing of adult traps, which was successful. This project has the potential to be important information for managers, to assess how supplementation and removal of strays could be better managed.

3. Project Relationships, Emerging Limiting Factors, and Tailored Questions for Type of Work (Hatchery, RME, Tagging)

This project links to others that seek to understand the effects of hatchery fish on wild fish reproductive success. As such, the set of projects stand to provide managers with much useful data to understand whether supplementation is a useful practice, with minimal impact, or whether it is another factor contributing to the demise of wild fish populations.

Climate change is identified as an emerging limiting factor, which may be exacerbated by stray hatchery fish, if the latter reduce reproductive success of wild fish.

4. Deliverables, Work Elements, Metrics, and Methods

Two points on methods and deliverables, first is the genotyping. The proposal indicates that SNP markers using Parental Based Tagging will be used to identify the source of stray hatchery fish and also to determine the RRS of hatchery and natural steelhead adults. This is reasonable, but those methods are under development and may not be sufficient. They need to be evaluated before a full commitment is made to use this genetic marker and identify stray hatchery individuals.

Second, it is not entirely clear to the ISRP how the treatment and control (reference) streams will be managed. The proposal states:

“The study design is a Before After Control Impact with the treatment of removing hatchery strays from Bakeoven and allowing strays to continue to enter and spawn at the normal rate in Buck Hollow Creek for the first phase of the study and then removing strays from Buck Hollow after the initial treatment in Bakeoven. This design allows for assessment of changes in productivity and survival between the treatment and control streams as well as a pre and post comparison in the control stream, Buck Hollow. For five years we will remove all hatchery fish from Bakeoven Creek and allow only wild fish to pass and spawn naturally. In Buck Hollow Creek, we will allow all wild and stray hatchery fish to pass upstream to spawn naturally for the first five years and then remove all hatchery strays there after.”

The proposal appears ambiguous to the ISRP on the subject of whether stray hatchery steelhead will be permitted access to Bakeoven Creek after the initial five year period. The ISRP believes the experimental design likely requires continued removal of hatchery fish from both locations throughout the duration of the breeding portion of the investigation. During phase two, strays probably need to be removed from both streams.

The ISRP’s rationale is that at the beginning of this experiment the assumption is that both natural populations of steelhead are genetically equivalent and have had many years of hatchery fish introgression. There is a genetic and environmental (density dependence) cost to having these hatchery fish present. If during the experiment you have two streams, one with hatchery fish present, and another where they are removed, you have two contrasts during those years. One contrast is the hatchery and natural fish in the mixed population, a second contrast is between the natural fish in the two locations. The first contrast measures both the genetic (non-native and hatchery) and environmental (hatchery) costs to the hatchery fish when they spawn. The second contrast (natural with hatchery versus natural without hatchery) measures the environmental effects (density and other ecological) of hatchery fish on natural spawning fitness of natural fish.

Once the treatment period ends (removal of hatchery fish), there is the opportunity to evaluate whether there has been a genetic improvement (genetic effect) in the population where hatchery fish were removed – a contrast of natural fish spawning naturally that are now genetically different. During the breeding period for this contrast the ISRP believes there should be an absence of hatchery-origin steelhead in both environments.

The ISRP believes that a full evaluation of the experimental design, with an explanation of all the RRS comparisons and their biological interpretation is required before full implementation.
First Round ISRP Date: 10/18/2010
First Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria (Qualified)
First Round ISRP Comment:
Qualification: In two years, the project proponents should provide a report on genotyping, success with the identification of stray hatchery fish, capture of adults and smolts in the target streams, and exclusion of hatchery adults in the target stream. At that time there needs to be a thorough presentation of the BACI experimental design to ensure it will be sufficient to evaluate genetic and demographic effects of straying.

The goal of this project is to measure the effects of stray hatchery steelhead, released from hatcheries in other subbasins with the Columbia River using a BACI manipulative experiment. These stray hatchery steelhead enter the Deschutes River, apparently to seek refuge in the cool water, and unknown numbers remain and spawn with wild Deschutes River steelhead. These data are critical because these hatchery steelhead routinely make up between 50% and 10 times the abundance of wild spawning steelhead, and the effects of this swamping are unknown.

The work is well planned, using proven methods, and has been refined several times through the proposal process. The results stand to help managers understand whether supplementation of steelhead in other parts of the Columbia River Basin can aid in sustaining and recovering wild stocks, or whether supplementation is another factor contributing to their demise through unanticipated effects that play out at long distances in other basins.

1. Purpose, Significance to Regional Programs, Technical Background, and Objectives

The investigators propose to evaluate the relative reproductive success (RRS) of stray hatchery and wild steelhead in two eastside tributaries of the Deschutes River, and to remove hatchery strays from a treatment stream and compare the RRS of these wild steelhead to those in a control stream (see comments on the experimental design in number 4 below).

The proposal is of great significance to regional programs. The effects of these strays could threaten the wild stocks of mid-Columbia steelhead, which are a threatened DPS, with extinction, when added to other stressors like climate change. Moreover, no comprehensive evaluation has yet been made of the effects of stray hatchery steelhead on wild fish.

The investigators have carefully planned a decade-long project, tested the adult traps, and include a conservation geneticist who is skilled in parentage analysis from another project (on Abernathy Creek, WA).

The objectives and methods are reasonable, the general design simple and elegant, and the data collection and analysis well planned (including power analysis). If anything, it would be ideal (if funding were available) to add another set of treatment and control tributaries, perhaps westside tributaries. This would make another statistical “block” which could be compared with the eastside block to determine whether any effects are stronger or weaker between these two environments.


2. History: Accomplishments, Results, and Adaptive Management

This is a new project, so there are no accomplishments or results to report, except the pilot testing of adult traps, which was successful. This project has the potential to be important information for managers, to assess how supplementation and removal of strays could be better managed.

3. Project Relationships, Emerging Limiting Factors, and Tailored Questions for Type of Work (Hatchery, RME, Tagging)

This project links to others that seek to understand the effects of hatchery fish on wild fish reproductive success. As such, the set of projects stand to provide managers with much useful data to understand whether supplementation is a useful practice, with minimal impact, or whether it is another factor contributing to the demise of wild fish populations.

Climate change is identified as an emerging limiting factor, which may be exacerbated by stray hatchery fish, if the latter reduce reproductive success of wild fish.

4. Deliverables, Work Elements, Metrics, and Methods

Two points on methods and deliverables, first is the genotyping. The proposal indicates that SNP markers using Parental Based Tagging will be used to identify the source of stray hatchery fish and also to determine the RRS of hatchery and natural steelhead adults. This is reasonable, but those methods are under development and may not be sufficient. They need to be evaluated before a full commitment is made to use this genetic marker and identify stray hatchery individuals.

Second, it is not entirely clear to the ISRP how the treatment and control (reference) streams will be managed. The proposal states:

“The study design is a Before After Control Impact with the treatment of removing hatchery strays from Bakeoven and allowing strays to continue to enter and spawn at the normal rate in Buck Hollow Creek for the first phase of the study and then removing strays from Buck Hollow after the initial treatment in Bakeoven. This design allows for assessment of changes in productivity and survival between the treatment and control streams as well as a pre and post comparison in the control stream, Buck Hollow. For five years we will remove all hatchery fish from Bakeoven Creek and allow only wild fish to pass and spawn naturally. In Buck Hollow Creek, we will allow all wild and stray hatchery fish to pass upstream to spawn naturally for the first five years and then remove all hatchery strays there after.”

The proposal appears ambiguous to the ISRP on the subject of whether stray hatchery steelhead will be permitted access to Bakeoven Creek after the initial five year period. The ISRP believes the experimental design likely requires continued removal of hatchery fish from both locations throughout the duration of the breeding portion of the investigation. During phase two, strays probably need to be removed from both streams.

The ISRP’s rationale is that at the beginning of this experiment the assumption is that both natural populations of steelhead are genetically equivalent and have had many years of hatchery fish introgression. There is a genetic and environmental (density dependence) cost to having these hatchery fish present. If during the experiment you have two streams, one with hatchery fish present, and another where they are removed, you have two contrasts during those years. One contrast is the hatchery and natural fish in the mixed population, a second contrast is between the natural fish in the two locations. The first contrast measures both the genetic (non-native and hatchery) and environmental (hatchery) costs to the hatchery fish when they spawn. The second contrast (natural with hatchery versus natural without hatchery) measures the environmental effects (density and other ecological) of hatchery fish on natural spawning fitness of natural fish.

Once the treatment period ends (removal of hatchery fish), there is the opportunity to evaluate whether there has been a genetic improvement (genetic effect) in the population where hatchery fish were removed – a contrast of natural fish spawning naturally that are now genetically different. During the breeding period for this contrast the ISRP believes there should be an absence of hatchery-origin steelhead in both environments.

The ISRP believes that a full evaluation of the experimental design, with an explanation of all the RRS comparisons and their biological interpretation is required before full implementation.
Documentation Links:

2008 FCRPS BiOp Workgroup Assessment

Assessment Number: 2007-299-00-BIOP-20101105
Project Number: 2007-299-00
Review: RME / AP Category Review
Proposal Number: RMECAT-2007-299-00
Completed Date: None
2008 FCRPS BiOp Workgroup Rating: Supports 2008 FCRPS BiOp
Comments: BiOp Workgroup Comments: No BiOp Workgroup Comments

The BiOp RM&E Workgroups made the following determinations regarding the proposal's ability or need to support BiOp Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) RPAs. If you have questions regarding these RPA association conclusions, please contact your BPA COTR and they will help clarify, or they will arrange further discussion with the appropriate RM&E Workgroup Leads. BiOp RPA associations for the proposed work are: (64.2)
All Questionable RPA Associations (0) and
All Deleted RPA Associations (0)
Proponent Response:
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 2007-299-00-NPCC-20090924
Project: 2007-299-00 - Investigation of Relative Reproductive Success of Stray Hatchery & Wild Steelhead & Influence of Hatchery Strays on Natural Productivity in Deschutes
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Approved Date: 10/23/2006
Recommendation: Do Not Fund
Comments:

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 2007-299-00-ISRP-20060831
Project: 2007-299-00 - Investigation of Relative Reproductive Success of Stray Hatchery & Wild Steelhead & Influence of Hatchery Strays on Natural Productivity in Deschutes
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 8/31/2006
Final Round ISRP Date: None
Final Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria (Qualified)
Final Round ISRP Comment:
This project is a basic monitoring project intended to investigate the extent and consequences of steelhead straying into the Deschutes subbasin. Out of subbasin straying of steelhead is a growing issue with the increase in hatchery production throughout the basin. The technical background is extensive. The table with values of strays into the Deschutes is convincing that there is need to explore the impact to wild fish (2X wild in some years and locations). Also, the proposal presents a solid of the potential issues, including likelihood of introgression with wild fish where hatchery fish have purposely been excluded from release.

The proposed work, including the expected work in the out-years, addresses a fundamental uncertainty regarding the extent and effects of out-of-subbasin strays on wild steelhead populations. The project has four objectives that relate specifically to high priority issues identified in the Deschutes Subbasin Plan for steelhead.

The work should be applicable to other situations and other species as well. The project is specifically related to other projects (especially M&E projects) and will share resources to accomplish tasks. While the project will focus on a single treatment and a single control stream within the subbasin, results should have at least a modicum of "range finding" value to other situations in the larger basin.

We reviewed a number of proposals aimed at undertaking parentage analysis. The description of the work is relatively thin and implies there is a standard set of protocols and experimental design for such work (which ISRP does not judge to be the case). This fact points to a general basinwide need to begin coordinating such work among groups, with other parentage studies, and with steelhead microsatellite work group for standard sampling and lab protocols.

The sponsors could enhance the robustness of the sampling if multiple treatment and control reaches were included (recognizing this would incur larger costs and effort). Sponsors should at least address this issue as a limitation in its broader applicability.

The ISRP's fundable recommendation is qualified because the proposal would be improved if the following items were clarified (the ISRP is not asking to review a response):
How feasible/possible is it to "remove all hatchery fish from Bakeoven Creek"? Juveniles (parr?) are to be examined to assess reproductive success. Might not smolt recruits be a more robust response variable? Are there prior experiences or attempts that can guide the efficacy of the approach?

How feasible are the proposed field sampling protocols? How do we know that the adult and smolt traps are going to work at the desired efficiencies in BakeOven Creek, for example. Are there prior experiences or attempts that can guide the efficacy of the approach?

How feasible are the adult steelhead traps? Are there prior experiences or attempts that can guide the efficacy of the approach?

There is some vagueness in analytical approach in Objective 3. For example, "...will apply appropriate parametric and non-parametric statistical tests," might be strengthened to include the basic approach (e.g., compare means, variance, covariance, etc. - although not necessarily the "specific" test).
Documentation Links:

Legal Assessment (In-Lieu)

Assessment Number: 2007-299-00-INLIEU-20090521
Project Number: 2007-299-00
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 10/6/2006
In Lieu Rating: Problems Exist
Cost Share Rating: None
Comment: Hatchery/stray research in Deschutes; other entities authorized/required (eg ODFW, Pelton-Round Butte).

Capital Assessment

Assessment Number: 2007-299-00-CAPITAL-20090618
Project Number: 2007-299-00
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 2/27/2007
Capital Rating: Does Not Qualify for Capital Funding
Capital Asset Category: None
Comment: None

Project Relationships: None

Name Role Organization
James Ruzycki Supervisor Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
Derrek Faber Project Lead Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
Jerilyn Irvine Administrative Contact Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
Philip Simpson Interested Party Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
Jesse Wilson Interested Party Bonneville Power Administration
Eric McOmie Project Manager Bonneville Power Administration
Peter Lofy Bonneville Power Administration