Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program
RSS Feed for updates to Project 2009-009-00 - Basinwide Supplementation Evaluation Follow this via RSS feed. Help setting up RSS feeds?

Project Summary

Project 2009-009-00 - Basinwide Supplementation Evaluation

Please Note: This project is the product of one or more merges and/or splits from other projects. Historical data automatically included here are limited to the current project and previous generation (the “parent” projects) only. The Project Relationships section details the nature of the relationships between this project and the previous generation. To learn about the complete ancestry of this project, please review the Project Relationships section on the Project Summary page of each parent project.

Project Number:
2009-009-00
Title:
Basinwide Supplementation Evaluation
Summary:
The goal of this project is to initiate a series of actions which support recommendations of the Ad Hoc Supplementation Workgroup (AHSWG) for a basinwide evaluation of the long term effects of hatchery supplementation on productivity of naturally spawning anadromous salmonid populations in the Columbia River basin (AHSWG 2008). The AHSWG used the widely accepted definition of supplementation provided by the Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP 1992):

"Supplementation is the use of artificial production in an attempt to maintain or increase natural production, while maintaining the long-term fitness of the target population and keeping the ecological and genetic impacts on non-target populations within specified biological limits."

The primary focus of the AHSWG (2008) recommendations is on acquisition and evaluation of more, and more reliable (accurate and precise), information on: a) trends in abundance and productivity of supplemented salmon and steelhead populations (Recommendation I, p. 3), and b) relative reproductive success (RRS) of naturally spawning salmon of natural origin versus hatchery origin within supplemented populations (Recommendation II, p. 24). Natural origin (NO) fish are defined as ones which are the product of a natural spawning that occurred in a stream. Hatchery origin (HO) fish are defined as those which are derived from artificially fertilized eggs which, generally speaking, were then incubated and the fry reared in a hatchery for some period. (HO fish could also include those which were artificially spawned and released as early as fertilized eggs or hatchlings, although this management option is infrequently used.)

The plan for Phase I of this project proposal covers only the first year of the 10-year period of the Accords (2008). Phase I includes four specific Project Objectives (with the total number of years projected for each Objective within the period of the Accords indicated in parentheses):
1) to use a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonars (DIDSONs) to obtain an estimate of the annual spawning escapement of the supplemented spring Chinook population upstream of the Castile Falls complex in the upper basin of the Klickitat River (4 years)
2) to complete development of a mark-recapture likelihood model which incorporates tag loss, including the uncertainty of the tag loss estimate, into the inference for population abundance (1 year)
3) to perform a relative reproductive success (RRS) study of NO versus HO salmon in a population associated with an ongoing supplementation monitoring and evaluation (M&E) program for which tissue samples have been collected but for which genetic analysis and estimation of RRS remains unfunded (10 years)
4) to perform RRS studies of NO versus HO salmon in four to five different populations which have been reintroduced (following extirpation of the native population) and supported through hatchery supplementation (10 years)
Proposer:
Proponent Orgs:
Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) (Tribe)
Starting FY:
2008
Ending FY:
2032
BPA PM:
Stage:
Implementation - Project Status Report
Area:
Province Subbasin %
Basinwide - 100.00%
Purpose:
Artificial Production
Emphasis:
RM and E
Focal Species:
Chinook - All Populations
Chinook - Deschutes River Summer/Fall ESU
Chinook - Lower Columbia River ESU
Chinook - Mid-Columbia River Spring ESU
Chinook - Snake River Fall ESU
Chinook - Snake River Spring/Summer
Chinook - Snake River Spring/Summer ESU
Chinook - Upper Columbia River Spring ESU
Chinook - Upper Columbia River Summer/Fall ESU
Chinook - Upper Willamette River ESU
Chum - Columbia River ESU
Coho - Lower Columbia River ESU
Coho - Unspecified Population
Cutthroat Trout, Coastal - All Anadromous Populations
Kokanee
Lamprey, Pacific
Sockeye - All Populations
Sockeye - Deschutes Subbasin
Sockeye - Lake Wenatchee ESU
Sockeye - Okanogan River ESU
Sockeye - Other
Steelhead - All Populations
Steelhead - Lower Columbia River DPS
Steelhead - Middle Columbia River DPS
Steelhead - Upper Columbia River DPS
Species Benefit:
Anadromous: 100.0%   Resident: 0.0%   Wildlife: 0.0%
Special:
None
BiOp Association:
None

No photos have been uploaded yet for this Project.

Summary of Budgets

To view all expenditures for all fiscal years, click "Project Exp. by FY"

To see more detailed project budget information, please visit the "Project Budget" page

Decided Budget Transfers  (FY2023 - FY2025)

Acct FY Acct Type Amount Fund Budget Decision Date
FY2023 Expense $926,239 From: Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2023-2025 Accord Extension 09/30/2022
FY2023 Expense $13,349 From: Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC Accord Transfers (CRITFC, CTUIR) 3/13/2023 03/13/2023
FY2023 Expense $40,636 From: Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC Accord Transfers (CRITFC, CTUIR) 3/13/2023 03/13/2023
FY2024 Expense $949,395 From: Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2023-2025 Accord Extension 09/30/2022
FY2024 Expense $18,162 From: Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC Jan 30, 2024 Transfers 01/30/2024
FY2025 Expense $973,130 From: Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2023-2025 Accord Extension 09/30/2022

Pending Budget Decision?  No


Actual Project Cost Share

Current Fiscal Year — 2024   DRAFT
Cost Share Partner Total Proposed Contribution Total Confirmed Contribution
There are no project cost share contributions to show.
Previous Fiscal Years
Fiscal Year Total Contributions % of Budget
2023 $27,000 3%
2022 $27,000 3%
2021 $27,000 3%
2020 $38,000 5%
2019 $38,000 6%
2018 $35,000 5%
2017 $35,000 4%
2016 $35,000 4%
2015 $35,000 5%
2014 $25,000 4%
2013 $45,650 8%
2012 $48,500 7%
2011 $43,000 6%

Contracts

The table below contains contracts with the following statuses: Active, Closed, Complete, History, Issued.
* "Total Contracted Amount" column includes contracted amount from both capital and expense components of the contract.
Expense Contracts:
Number Contractor Name Title Status Total Contracted Amount Dates
42631 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 200900900 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTAL EVALUATION - PHASE I Closed $501,288 4/1/2009 - 4/30/2010
47441 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 200900900 EXP ACCORD BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVAL Closed $466,048 5/1/2010 - 4/30/2011
53108 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVAL FY11 Closed $647,402 5/1/2011 - 4/30/2012
57275 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVALUATION Closed $634,211 5/1/2012 - 4/30/2013
61294 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVAL Closed $533,001 5/1/2013 - 4/30/2014
65188 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVAL Closed $588,542 5/1/2014 - 4/30/2015
69191 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVAL Closed $698,107 5/1/2015 - 4/30/2016
72525 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVALUATION Closed $864,708 5/1/2016 - 4/30/2017
76019 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVALUATION Closed $871,221 5/1/2017 - 4/30/2018
BPA-010326 Bonneville Power Administration Basinwide Supplementation Evaluation Active $1,895 10/1/2017 - 9/30/2018
73354 REL 5 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVALUATION Closed $690,728 5/1/2018 - 4/30/2019
73354 REL 25 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVALUATION Closed $622,848 5/1/2019 - 4/30/2020
73354 REL 41 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVALUATION Closed $750,323 5/1/2020 - 4/30/2021
73354 REL 57 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVALUATION Closed $804,443 5/1/2021 - 4/30/2022
BPA-012883 Bonneville Power Administration FY22 PIT tags Active $6,720 10/1/2021 - 9/30/2022
73354 REL 74 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVALUATION Closed $765,854 5/1/2022 - 4/30/2023
BPA-013478 Bonneville Power Administration FY23 PIT tags Active $6,720 10/1/2022 - 9/30/2023
73354 REL 91 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVALUATION Issued $973,504 5/1/2023 - 4/30/2024
BPA-013912 Bonneville Power Administration FY24 PIT Tags Active $10,080 10/1/2023 - 9/30/2024
73354 REL 108 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVALUATION Issued $957,477 5/1/2024 - 4/30/2025



Annual Progress Reports
Expected (since FY2004):15
Completed:13
On time:13
Status Reports
Completed:75
On time:57
Avg Days Early:1

                Count of Contract Deliverables
Earliest Contract Subsequent Contracts Title Contractor Earliest Start Latest End Latest Status Accepted Reports Complete Green Yellow Red Total % Green and Complete Canceled
42631 47441, 53108, 57275, 61294, 65188, 69191, 72525, 76019, 73354 REL 5, 73354 REL 25, 73354 REL 41, 73354 REL 57, 73354 REL 74, 73354 REL 91, 73354 REL 108 2009-009-00 EXP BASINWIDE SUPPLEMENTATION EVALUATION Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 04/01/2009 04/30/2025 Issued 75 271 0 0 24 295 91.86% 0
BPA-10326 Basinwide Supplementation Evaluation Bonneville Power Administration 10/01/2017 09/30/2018 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-12883 FY22 PIT tags Bonneville Power Administration 10/01/2021 09/30/2022 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-13478 FY23 PIT tags Bonneville Power Administration 10/01/2022 09/30/2023 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-13912 FY24 PIT Tags Bonneville Power Administration 10/01/2023 09/30/2024 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Project Totals 75 271 0 0 24 295 91.86% 0


The table content is updated frequently and thus contains more recent information than what was in the original proposal reviewed by ISRP and Council.

Review: 2022 Anadromous Fish Habitat & Hatchery Review

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 2009-009-00-NPCC-20230316
Project: 2009-009-00 - Basinwide Supplementation Evaluation
Review: 2022 Anadromous Fish Habitat & Hatchery Review
Approved Date: 4/15/2022
Recommendation: Implement
Comments: Bonneville and Sponsor to take the review remarks into consideration in project documentation. See Policy Issue I.b.

[Background: See https://www.nwcouncil.org/2021-2022-anadromous-habitat-and-hatchery-review/]

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 2009-009-00-ISRP-20230308
Project: 2009-009-00 - Basinwide Supplementation Evaluation
Review: 2022 Anadromous Fish Habitat & Hatchery Review
Completed Date: 3/14/2023
Final Round ISRP Date: 2/10/2022
Final Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria
Final Round ISRP Comment:

The Basinwide Supplementation Evaluation (BSE) Project provides state-of-the-art genetic tools (e.g., sophisticated pedigree analyses) to support effectiveness monitoring and evaluation of salmonid supplementation and reintroduction projects on Tribal ceded lands throughout the Columbia River Basin. Most of these individual projects are implemented with funding from the Council and BPA, but they lack technical expertise or financial capacity to perform aspects of needed RM&E. Results from the BSE Project are published and used in adaptive management decision processes that guide future analyses, recovery actions, and management decisions.

The project uses two key metrics for assessing supplementation success, the relative reproductive success (RRS) of hatchery fish compared to natural fish in nature and the demographic boost achieved by hatchery spawned and reared fish relative to natural production. In combination, these two metrics are often used to indicate the success of supplementation programs. However, to clearly assess if hatchery supplementation is working, additional information is needed. Using RRS and demographic boost analyses does not account for longer-term natural population fitness reductions that may occur because of hatchery intervention. The value of the project would be enhanced if this risk was considered and approaches to assess it were developed.

The project is also investigating methods to reduce the occurrence of precocious maturation in reared Chinook salmon males. A suite of pilot rearing studies tested the effects of various cultural strategies on precocious maturation in males. A production scale experiment using two promising methods and control fish will begin in broodyear 2022 and run through broodyear 2024.

The project addresses many key uncertainties associated with hatchery supplementation and reintroductions identified by the ISRP and ISAB in previous reviews. It has many management applications, and results from the project’s effectiveness monitoring and precocious maturation experiments will be of value and interest to many of the Basin’s fishery managers.

Q1: Clearly defined objectives and outcomes

All BSE Project studies can be categorized under one of three complementary research objectives: to monitor and evaluate (1) supplemented populations or (2) reintroduced populations of salmon and steelhead; or (3) to conduct experiments to investigate physiological processes and development of salmon and steelhead reared in a hatchery environment.

Flow diagrams are used to illustrate the experimental design or logical sequence of tasks for major studies under each research objective. Each flow diagram possesses multiple boxes that describe a sequence of tasks that will take place to reach an expected quantitative outcome. The outcomes are meant to provide fishery managers with data that can be used to evaluate whether an individual project is meeting its programmatic goals. Or in the case of Research Objective 3, whether altered fish cultural practices can achieve reductions in precocious maturation.

The steps in the flow diagrams essentially fulfill the intent of SMART objectives. They describe specific tasks, they are measurable, attainable, relevant to the problem being examined, and they establish deadlines for project completion. The intent of having SMART objectives is to facilitate adaptive management within a project. Typically, such objectives have quantitative targets. However, the BSE Project includes too many component studies under Research Objectives 1 and 2 to produce such targets for each study. Specific quantitative targets are included when appropriate for the fish culture experiments under Research Objective 3. The series of Gantt charts in section 7 provide commendable clarity and detail about expected timelines.

Q2: Methods

The extensive methods section (20 pages) provides a clear and well-referenced summary of diverse approaches and procedures being used in the proposed studies. The proponents are using state-of-the-art genetic methods to perform pedigree assessments, stock identification, and to calculate reproductive success and relative reproductive success. Some of the methods being employed were developed by the proponents. For example, the genotyping-in-thousands by sequencing approach (GT-seq) was developed by CRITFC personnel and is being used by the project to genotype thousands of individuals at hundreds of SNP markers. Resulting genotype data are then supplied to software programs that identify parent-offspring and sibling relationships. The statistical approaches being used, e.g., the use of ANOVAs to test null hypotheses and generalized linear models (GLMs) to estimate covariate effects, are appropriate. This statistical approach is predominately used to analyze data from the supplementation and reintroduction assessments occurring under Research Objectives 1 and 2.

Relative reproductive success of sockeye reintroduced to Cle Elum Lake has been inferred by comparing GSI assignments to the two donor stocks (Osoyoos and Wenatchee) in samples at successive life stages. The broodstock for the reintroduction was collected at Priest Rapid Dam from 2011-2017 and comprised, on average, 70% Osoyoos and 30% Wenatchee origin fish. In contrast, spawner carcasses collected in Cle Elum Lake in 2013-2016 averaged 72% Wenatchee and 28% Osoyoos, and returning adults sampled at Roza Dam in 2018 were 84% Wenatchee, 7% Osoyoos and 9% hybrids. Accordingly, the proponents estimate a much higher rate of replacement for Wenatchee (0.80) than Osoyoos (0.23).

They also reported a bimodal distribution of spawning time with carcasses assigning to Wenatchee peaking a month earlier than carcasses assigning to Osoyoos, consistent with the typical spawning time of the donor stocks in their respective lake systems. The ISRP notes that spawning time in sockeye and kokanee populations is typically fine-tuned to the expected thermal regime during incubation so that fry emerge at a favorable time in the spring (Brannon 1987; Wood and Foote 1990). We think the late spawning time of Osoyoos sockeye is likely adaptive in the warmer (lake-fed) winter temperature regime of Osoyoos Lake, but mis-matched to the colder winter regime at Cle Elum Lake, thus accounting for the lower reproductive success of Osoyoos spawners in Cle Elum Lake. We recommend that the proponents test this explanation by comparing temperature profiles during incubation at the Cle Elum, Osoyoos and Wenatchee spawning sites, and ideally, by confirming similar development rates (i.e., degree-days needed to complete incubation from fertilization to emergence) under standard (“common garden”) conditions for both donor stocks.

One of the reintroduction projects being evaluated is comparing the productivity and reproductive success of NOR and HOR spring Chinook spawning in Lookingglass Creek. Data from nine broodyears is currently under analysis. NOR spring Chinook strays may return to the Lookingglass weir and hatchery. It is important that the methods being used to identify these strays are described. The inadvertent incorporation of these fish in the calculation of recruits-per-spawner would create a positive bias in the project’s R/S estimates for NOR fish.

Genetic and physiological parameter data are being used to evaluate the effects of different fish rearing strategies on the incidence of precocious maturation. The methods being employed to collect physiological data are well described and appropriate. The proposal indicates that in some rearing experiments specific growth rates (SGR) of fish undergoing different treatments may be assessed. The formula used to calculate SGR contains a typo. The second weight term in the numerator should be weight at time 1 rather than weight at time 2. A recent review of SGR states that SGRs are difficult to interpret because they express additive changes in loge weight per unit of time (Crane et al. 2020). Crane et al. algebraically rearrange the standard equation so that proportional increases in weight can be obtained and indicate that multiplying this value by 100 will provide per cent increases in weight per unit of time. The proponents may wish to investigate the use of these new formulas in their Research Objective 3 experiments. The experimental designs and statistical approaches being used in the rearing experiments are well described and are scientifically valid.

References

Brannon, E.I. 1987. Mechanisms stabilizing salmonid fry emergence timing. P.120-124. In H.D. Smith, L. Margolis, and C.C. Wood [ed.] Sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) population biology and future management. Can. Spec. Publ. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 96.

Crane, D.P., D.H. Ogle, and D.E. Shoup. 2020. Use and misuse of a common growth metric: guidance for appropriately calculating and reporting specific growth rate. Reviews in Aquaculture 12:1542-1547.

Wood, C.C., and C.J. Foote. 1990. Genetic differences in the early development and growth of sympatric sockeye and kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) and their hybrids. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 47:2250-2260.

Q3: Provisions for M&E

Funding and expertise are often too limited within individual projects to conduct adequate, RM&E. The BSE Project was established to provide tools to support effectiveness monitoring of tribally managed projects that lack RM&E capacity. Metrics and insights generated by the BSE Project about the biological effects of supplementation and reintroduction programs are being used by tribal partners to evaluate if their projects are meeting their restoration goals. Thus, expected outcomes from the BSE Project become key inputs to adaptive management cycles in the partnered projects. The proponents are in regular contact with their partners, sharing findings, and working to ensure that implementation tasks (e.g., planned genetic sampling) occur as expected.

The proponents also have their own internal evaluation and adjustment process. For Research Objectives 1 and 2, project objectives are shared with tribal managers and any involved co-managers, either informally during meetings with collaborators or formally through presentations. Plans are in place to hold annual virtual meetings with collaborators and biannual genetics workshops within the fish science community. However, the ISRP urges the proponents to develop a formal adaptive management procedure to be followed during such meetings.

Q4: Results - benefits to fish and wildlife

The Progress to Date section of the proposal provides an extensive (34-page) overview of the research questions being addressed; objectives, approaches, and quantitative results for the diverse suite of component studies; plans for future work, and implications of the results so far obtained. These accounts showcase how useful outcomes from the BSE Project are to individual tribally managed projects. The methods used and results obtained also have broad value to fishery managers dealing with similar questions in the Columbia River Basin and beyond.

In our review of research projects in 2018 (ISRP 2018-8), we noted that NOAA researchers had identified an underappreciated problem of precocious maturation of males in many of the Basin’s Chinook hatcheries. In some hatcheries, over 50% of the males may mature as two-year old minijacks. Such fish may distort smolt-to-adult recruit (SAR) values, potentially compete with wild conspecifics for resources, induce numerical predator responses, and cryptically inflate pHOS values in natural spawning populations. Ongoing work and planned experiments by the proponents are examining how fish cultural methods can be implemented to substantially reduce the occurrence of precocious parr in cultured Chinook. Pilot studies performed by the proponents suggest that periods of starvation and photoperiod manipulations can significantly reduce precocious maturation. Future work to refine each of these approaches is scheduled and a production-scale study is planned to evaluate their effectiveness under normal hatchery operations. Results from these studies will be of value across the Basin and elsewhere.

Documentation Links:
Review: 2018 Research Project Status Review

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 2009-009-00-NPCC-20210302
Project: 2009-009-00 - Basinwide Supplementation Evaluation
Review: 2018 Research Project Status Review
Approved Date: 12/20/2018
Recommendation: Implement
Comments: Recommendation: This project to be reviewed as part of the 2021 Anadromous Habitat and Hatchery Review. Consider ISRP comments in proposal as appropriate. See programmatic issue on Fish Propagation.
Review: Fish Accord ISRP Review

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 2009-009-00-ISRP-20100323
Project: 2009-009-00 - Basinwide Supplementation Evaluation
Review: Fish Accord ISRP Review
Completed Date: None
First Round ISRP Date: 5/22/2009
First Round ISRP Rating: Response Requested
First Round ISRP Comment:

Objective 1. Use Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) to estimate natural escapement of spring Chinook salmon above Castile Falls, Klickitat River – RESPONSE REQUESTED Objective 2. Complete development of mark-recapture likelihood model which incorporates tag loss – MEETS SCIENTIFIC REVIEW CRITERIA (QUALIFIED) Objective 3. Perform relative reproductive success study of NO versus HO salmon in population associated with an ongoing supplementation project – MEETS SCIENTIFIC REVIEW CRITERIA (QUALIFIED) Objective 4. Perform relative reproductive success studies of NO versus HO salmon in four to five reintroduced salmon populations [Phase I] – MEETS SCIENTIFIC REVIEW CRITERIA (QUALIFIED)

Documentation Links:
Review: RME / AP Category Review

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 2009-009-00-NPCC-20110127
Project: 2009-009-00 - Basinwide Supplementation Evaluation
Review: RME / AP Category Review
Proposal: RMECAT-2009-009-00
Proposal State: Pending BPA Response
Approved Date: 6/10/2011
Recommendation: Fund (Qualified)
Comments: Implement with condition through FY 2016 as per January 12, 2010 Council decision: Sponsor to address ISRP qualifications in contracting (ISRP document 2009-54).
Conditions:
Council Condition #1 This recommendation was made by the Council at its meeting on January 12, 2010. The ISRP (ISRP document 2009-54) found that the follow-up information regarding Objective 1 (i.e., Use Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) to estimate natural escapement of spring Chinook salmon above Castile Falls, Klickitat River) meets scientific review criteria (qualified). The qualification addresses the need for the DIDSON results to be reviewed by the ISRP in three years, as it relates to a tool for estimating escapement for spring Chinook population upstream of the Castile Falls in the Klickitat River and elsewhere in the Columbia River Basin. This qualification can be addressed through contracting and be reviewed as part of future reviews.

2008 FCRPS BiOp Workgroup Assessment

Assessment Number: 2009-009-00-BIOP-20101105
Project Number: 2009-009-00
Review: RME / AP Category Review
Proposal Number: RMECAT-2009-009-00
Completed Date: None
2008 FCRPS BiOp Workgroup Rating: Response Requested
Comments: BiOp Workgroup Comments: Please identify:
1. Why your data is "not electronically available"; and
2. What data sets will not be "electronically available" for various deliverables. Please specify the deliverable that is not electronically available. (Note a data set includes the raw data collected and additional data on analysis). For example if there is a deliverable for population adult abundance or habitat, we expect your raw and synthesized data to be made available electronically.
- Your response may help BPA identify funding needs for data repositories or identify an existing data warehouse that your data could be stored.

The BiOp RM&E Workgroups made the following determinations regarding the proposal's ability or need to support BiOp Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) RPAs. If you have questions regarding these RPA association conclusions, please contact your BPA COTR and they will help clarify, or they will arrange further discussion with the appropriate RM&E Workgroup Leads. BiOp RPA associations for the proposed work are: ()
All Questionable RPA Associations () and
All Deleted RPA Associations ()
Proponent Response:

In the RM&E section “Where will you post or publish the data your project generates?” I mistakenly checked the “NOT ELECTRONICALLY AVAILABLE” box – it should have been left blank (as were the other optional check-boxes).  Activities within this Project involve collection of two types of data.  The first involves acquisition of continuous hourly DIDSON sonar recordings at the upstream outlet of the Castile Falls Fishway in the Klickitat River, and subsequent reading of the files to note instances of upstream migration.  These counts of adult spring Chinook are used to produce an annual escapement estimate into the upper basin.  The second type of data is genotype information acquired for individual fish tissue samples analyzed for a suite of DNA (microsatellite) loci.  These samples are provided annually to CRITFC by various tribal and state agencies for adult and juvenile fish associated with a series of salmon supplementation or reintroduction/supplementation hatchery programs.  The genotype information is then used to identify parentage, followed by analyses to estimate relative reproductive success of hatchery versus natural origin fish.  Neither of these data set types concord with the options provided in this section of Taurus.  Therefore, I indicated immediately below under “Other”, the URL and Title for the web site at which our agency’s technical reports are posted.  As particular studies within the scope of the project are completed, technical reports are produced and posted to this web site.

 

Indeed, two reports for the Klickitat spring Chinook escapement studies (for 2009 and 2010) are already posted.  The raw data for the fish passage counts is provided in an Appendix to each report, and a compilation of the sonar video file clips of the associated fish passage events is also posted to the web site.  Copies of these reports were, of course, provided to the Yakama Nation collaborators/co-authors, and the reports are also posted as Attachments to the Project’s site within PISCES, with View Permission indicated as “Public (anyone can access via web)”; unfortunately, PISCES will not accept the video file.

 

Unlike the annual DIDSON escapement studies, the relative reproductive success studies are multi-year efforts, and summary reports will be produced only every few years.  The reports will be produced with co-authorship by representatives from the collaborating agencies, and posted in PISCES and in the CRITFC technical reports sites.  The first of these, concerning the reintroduced spring Chinook in the Hood River, will be produced later in 2011.  Results from these studies will also be summarized in written manuscripts for publication in scientific journals, as well as in oral slide presentations and posters for presentation at scientific meetings – copies of which will be included as attachments in PISCES.  The raw data sets of genotype information will be made available to the participating tribal and state agencies as well as the subsequent parentage and statistical analyses.  This information will also be made available to other interested persons upon request.


Project Relationships: This project Merged From 2008-513-00 effective on 1/5/2009
Relationship Description: Combining project 2008-513-00 (along with 2008-522-00 and 2008-523-00) since all projects support supplementation evaluation.

This project Merged From 2008-522-00 effective on 1/5/2009
Relationship Description: Combining project 2008-522-00 (along with 2008-513-00 and 2008-523-00) since all projects support supplementation evaluation.

This project Merged From 2008-523-00 effective on 1/5/2009
Relationship Description: Combining project 2008-523-00 (along with 2008-513-00 and 2008-522-00) since all projects support supplementation evaluation.


Name Role Organization
Douglas Hatch Supervisor Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC)
Christine Golightly Administrative Contact Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC)
Kristen Jule Supervisor Bonneville Power Administration
Hayley Nuetzel Project Lead Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC)
Amy Mai Interested Party Bonneville Power Administration
Martin Allen Project Manager Bonneville Power Administration