Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program
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Project Summary

Project 2008-524-00 - Implement Tribal Pacific Lamprey Restoration Plan
Project Number:
2008-524-00
Title:
Implement Tribal Pacific Lamprey Restoration Plan
Summary:
The Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) or “eel” is an ancient, anadromous, native species, valuable to the ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest and to the Native American Tribes that use this fishery for food, medicine, and ceremony (Close et al. 2002; CRITFC 2008). Pacific lamprey have declined precipitously in abundance over the last few decades and the need to acquire information to inform management and conservation initiatives is imperative if this valuable resource is to be maintained and the cultural legacy of Native Americans preserved (CRITFC 2008).

As has been found in other river systems such as the Great Lakes (Haro and Kynard 1997) and in Europe (Laine et al. 1998), passage impediments throughout the basin considerably impact upstream production. Considering dam count data, adult and juvenile distribution and adult tagging studies, the tribes believe that inadequate passage is the most urgent problem facing lamprey in the Columbia River Basin (CRITFC 2008). In its report on critical uncertainties for lamprey, the Columbia Basin Lamprey Technical Working Group (CBLTWG 2005) prioritized passage improvements as a top rank critical uncertainty in the overall effort to restore lamprey. Only about 50% of adult lamprey successfully pass each mainstem dam (Moser et al. 2002b). While little is known about juvenile lamprey passage, impingement of juveniles on turbine intake screens and loss of juveniles in irrigation and water withdrawal facilities with screens not designed for lamprey is significant.

In their 1999 review of the Corps of Engineers Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program, the Independent Scientific Advisory Board of the Northwest Power Planning Council (ISAB) advocated for creating a “biodiversity standard” of which passage fixes for all fish should be considered. They recommended passage standards and targets, passage designs and evaluations that focus on protecting biodiversity and that best fit natural behavior patterns and river processes (ISAB 1999). The Northwest Power and Conservation Council adopted these elements in its 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. CRITFC, through administration and coordination of this project with other region entities (i.e. Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Reclamation, FERC licensed utilities, USFWS, state fish and wildlife agencies, CBLTWG) will develop and provide key passage design information to improve adult and juvenile lamprey passage basin wide.

The CBLTWG (2005) also identified lamprey population delineation as highly important for management and conservation. The lack of passage success may have direct genetic effects. This project, through CRITFC, in association with the University of British Columbia and other genetic resources will increase the knowledge of lamprey population and genetic structure through supplementation of existing libraries of genetic markers such as microsatellites.

In addition, the CBLTWG (2005) identified increased knowledge of factors which limit lamprey population growth as highly important. CRITFC, through administration and coordination with other region entities (i.e. Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Reclamation, FERC licensed utilities, USFWS, state fish and wildlife agencies, CBLTWG), will document lamprey mainstem habitat preferences, evaluate the impacts of environmental stressors and assess trophic relationships.

This project will be closely administered and coordinated with the Accord Lamprey Projects by the Umatilla, Yakama and Warm Springs tribes, and by Nez Perce Tribal lamprey restoration projects. Project objectives include:

1. Determine and improve mainstem lamprey passage efficiency, survival and habitat
2. Determine adult and juvenile passage rates for each route of passage at each mainstem dam and develop passage criterion
3. Determine individual and cumulative impacts of mainstem hydroprojects (dams and reservoirs) on lamprey
4. Identify and apply scheduled structural and operational improvements to achieve volitional adult passage standards approximating the best known achievable rates at mainstem dams and reservoirs (i.e. 80% passage efficiency at The Dalles)
5. Determine water quality impacts of hydroprojects on lamprey and implement actions to reduce these impacts.
6. Assess and address impacts of irrigation and other mainstem water withdrawal structures on lamprey.
7. Inventory lamprey abundance, distribution and habitat in mainstem rivers and reservoirs
8. Inventory and address actions to address mainstem avian, piscivorous and marine mammal predation.
9. Determine lamprey genetic structure and maintain genetic integrity
10. Monitor lamprey population status and trends
11. Establish regional data protocols for collection, storage and analysis.
Develop means to widely access and share information.
12. Expand existing knowledge on limiting factors and critical uncertainties
Proposer:
None
Proponent Orgs:
Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) (Tribe)
Starting FY:
2008
Ending FY:
2032
Stage:
Implementation - Project Status Report
Area:
Province Subbasin %
Lower Columbia Willamette 100.00%
Purpose:
Hydrosystem
Emphasis:
RM and E
Focal Species:
Lamprey, Pacific
Lamprey, River
Lamprey, Western Brook
Other Anadromous
Species Benefit:
Anadromous: 100.0%   Resident: 0.0%   Wildlife: 0.0%
Special:
None
BiOp Association:
None

Photos of the surgical procedure for adult Pacific lamprey.

Figure Name: Figure 2

Document ID: P120333

Document: IMPLEMENT TRIBAL PACIFIC LAMPREY RESTORATION PLAN

Page Number: 20

Project: 2008-524-00

Contract: 42607

Map of Willamette River showing radio telemetry fixed receiver sites maintained in 2009 and 2010.

Figure Name: Figure 3

Document ID: P120333

Document: IMPLEMENT TRIBAL PACIFIC LAMPREY RESTORATION PLAN

Page Number: 21

Project: 2008-524-00

Contract: 42607

Photos of the surgical procedure for adult Pacific lamprey.

Figure Name: Figure A-3

Document ID: P120333

Document: IMPLEMENT TRIBAL PACIFIC LAMPREY RESTORATION PLAN

Page Number: 32

Project: 2008-524-00

Contract: 42607

Map of Willamette River showing radio telemetry fixed receiver sites maintained in 2010.

Figure Name: Figure C-2

Document ID: P120333

Document: IMPLEMENT TRIBAL PACIFIC LAMPREY RESTORATION PLAN

Page Number: 56

Project: 2008-524-00

Contract: 42607


Summary of Budgets

To view all expenditures for all fiscal years, click "Project Exp. by FY"

Expense SOY Budget Working Budget Contracted Amount Modified Contract Amount Expenditures *
FY2018 (Previous) $700,582 $844,080 $844,080 $844,080 $515,821

Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC $844,080 $844,080 $844,080 $515,821
FY2019 (Current) $876,511 $876,511 $876,511 $387,809

Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC $876,511 $876,511 $876,511 $387,809
FY2020 (Next) $703,222 $703,222 $0 $0 $0

Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC $703,222 $0 $0 $0

* Expenditures data includes accruals and are based on data through 31-Mar-2019

Decided Budget Transfers  (FY2018 - FY2020)

Acct FY Acct Type Amount Fund Budget Decision Date
FY2018 Expense $700,582 From: Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC FY18 Initial Planning Budgets (WS, CTUIR, YN, CRITFC) 7/18/2017 07/18/2017
FY2018 Expense $0 From: Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC CRITFC Establish FY18 budget for 2009-022-00 Accord Administration 07/26/2017
FY2018 Expense $143,498 From: Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC Accord Budget Transfers (CCT, CRITFC) 4/19/18 04/19/2018
FY2019 Expense $703,222 From: Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC Accord Extensions (CRITFC) 10/4/2018 10/04/2018
FY2019 Expense $96,244 From: Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC Accord budget transfer (CCT, CRITFC) 3/14/2019 03/14/2019
FY2019 Expense $77,045 From: Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC Accord budget transfer (CCT, CRITFC) 3/14/2019 03/14/2019
FY2020 Expense $703,222 From: Fish Accord - LRT - CRITFC Accord Extensions (CRITFC) 10/4/2018 10/04/2018

Pending Budget Decision?  No


Actual Project Cost Share

Current Fiscal Year — 2019   DRAFT
Cost Share Partner Total Proposed Contribution Total Confirmed Contribution
There are no project cost share contributions to show.
Previous Fiscal Years
Fiscal Year Total Contributions % of Budget
2018 (Draft)
2017 (Draft)
2016 (Draft)
2015 $77,757 10 %
2014 $106,596 13 %
2013 $206,995 25 %
2012 $125,000 19 %
2011 $202,254 25 %
2010 $40,000 9 %
2009
2008

Contracts

The table below contains contracts with the following statuses: Active, Complete, History, Issued.
* "Total Contracted Amount" column includes contracted amount from both capital and expense components of the contract.
Expense Contracts:
Number Contractor Name Title Status Total Contracted Amount Dates
75896 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2008-524-00 EXP IMPLEMENT TRIBAL PACIFIC LAMPREY RESTORATION Issued $581,720 5/1/2017 - 4/30/2018
73354 REL 6 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2008-524-00 EXP IMPLEMENT TRIBAL PACIFIC LAMPREY REST (CRITFC) Issued $844,080 5/1/2018 - 4/30/2019
73354 REL 24 SOW Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 2008-524-00 EXP IMPLEMENT TRIBAL PACIFIC LAMPREY RESTORATION Pending $876,511 5/1/2019 - 4/30/2020



Annual Progress Reports
Expected (since FY2004):13
Completed:8
On time:7
Status Reports
Completed:48
On time:14
Avg Days Late:19

Earliest Subsequent           Accepted Count of Contract Deliverables
Contract Contract(s) Title Contractor Start End Status Reports Complete Green Yellow Red Total % Green and Complete Canceled
42607 53281, 57070, 60877, 65093, 68780, 72349, 75896, 73354 REL 6 200852400 EXP LAMPREY PASSAGE DESIGN Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) 02/2009 02/2009 Pending 47 97 13 0 27 137 80.29% 4
Project Totals 47 97 13 0 27 137 80.29% 4


The table content is updated frequently and thus contains more recent information than what was in the original proposal reviewed by ISRP and Council.

Review: 2019-2021 Mainstem/Program Support

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 2008-524-00-ISRP-20190404
Project: 2008-524-00 - Implement Tribal Pacific Lamprey Restoration Plan
Review: 2019-2021 Mainstem/Program Support
Proposal Number: NPCC19-2008-524-00
Completed Date: None
First Round ISRP Date: 4/4/2019
First Round ISRP Rating: Response Requested
First Round ISRP Comment:

Response requested comment:

It is evident that good progress has been made since 2008 in developing cost-effective genetic methods for assessing parentage, demonstrating successful production of progeny from adult translocations, and identifying species, sex, and population structure in both neutral and adaptive genes. To date, the project appears to have been very effective at both enabling and conducting research to support the conservation of Pacific lamprey. 

However, the project is complicated to review because it has effectively become an "umbrella" project requesting funding for a diversity of component projects. Even during the 2010 Category Review, the ISRP noted "the information in the proposal describing the methodology to undertake the remaining sub-objectives (and associated tasks) is too general to serve as a basis for scientific review. These sub-objectives need a response with additional details. ... As the proposal now stands, it is simply too general. It lacks specific, detailed methodology and study design to be considered scientifically justifiable. The proponents should give serious consideration to prioritizing (with rationale) the myriad of conceivable projects that could fall under the broad "plan" as outlined in the present proposal. It would be helpful if the proponents culled those sub-objectives that would not be funded directly by this project and provided more details on the methods that will be used to address lamprey passage and distribution questions." This situation has not yet been addressed. 

Given the information and time available for the 2019 Category Review, it is infeasible for the ISRP to review all the component projects listed in this proposal; and it is infeasible for the proponents to have included in a single proposal all the information needed for rigorous scientific review of this complex project. Accordingly, our review focuses on the extent to which the proponents are providing leadership and scientific expertise to achieve the stated objectives. In particular, we are examining how the component projects are prioritized for funding, how their effectiveness will be monitored and evaluated, and how overall progress toward achieving the objectives of the umbrella project will be assessed. In short, the ISRP is looking for evidence of a process for adaptive management and reassurance that the umbrella role is cost effective. In the future, it may also be useful for the ISRP to undertake a rigorous scientific review of some or all the component projects.

To complete this review, the ISRP requests a response to address the following concerns:

  1. Explain how this umbrella project links with other Pacific lamprey recovery efforts in the Basin. What work is being done by CRITFC staff and how much work is subcontracted to other entities? To what extent does this project duplicate or complement the umbrella role of the Lamprey Conservation Initiative (2017-005-00)?
  2. Provide quantifiable biological or physical objectives with timelines (i.e., SMART objectives) to support or replace the qualitative objectives (i.e., goals) provided in the current proposal. The quantitative elements could be measurable tasks or deliverables associated with the qualitative objectives. Additional quantitative objectives (or deliverables) and timelines should be provided for each of the component projects. Those objectives will be needed for the proponents (or ISRP) to evaluate the performance of the component projects.
  3. Describe the process by which component projects are prioritized and selected for funding. 
  4. Describe the procedures by which the effectiveness of each component project will be monitored and evaluated. 
  5. Describe the adaptive management process (i.e., review cycles) for assessing progress toward achieving the overall objectives, for adjusting the suite of component projects based on observed outcomes, and for revising objectives.

Comment:

1. Objectives, Significance to Regional Programs, and Technical Background

Each objective states a commitment to engage with appropriate regional forums or working groups to contribute to one of six range-wide themes for restoration identified in the Lamprey Conservation Agreement. These qualitative objectives are expanded into more specific statements of actions and tasks within Table 4.4, Objectives and associated actions, and Project Deliverable Sections. Although some of the deliverables refer to specific activities, they are also vague, not quantifiable, and lack expected benefits or timelines. In the section "Objectives and Deliverables" (pages 20-22/30), the response to the prompt "How the project deliverables help meet this objective" is "to be developed" in every case. 

The most recent annual report (for 2016) provides different, more specific and somewhat quantitative objectives for each of 12 "work elements," but time lines are not stated. 

Anticipated outcomes are not expressed quantitatively. Explicit timelines for completion are not provided for any of the objectives. The ISRP recognizes that specific outcomes and completion dates may be difficult to predict for this project because they depend on decisions to be made collaboratively with other partners.

The proposal clearly explains why this project was initiated and how it is strategically consistent with biological objectives identified in the Pacific Lamprey Restoration Initiative, as well as critical uncertainties identified in the Fish and Wildlife Program. Even so, it is difficult to understand how this diverse project stands in relation to other more specific projects that are also being reviewed by the ISRP in this Category Review. 

2. Results and Adaptive Management

Participation in regional Pacific lamprey forums and working groups has enabled research that is producing a diverse suite of impressive results (listed and summarized in the proposal and annual reports). These results were generated by a collection of focused component projects, some of which are also being reviewed individually, at least in part, elsewhere in this Category Review (e.g., the Willamette Falls Lamprey Project, 2008-308-00). The component studies are too diverse, with too little detail provided in the proposal and annual reports, to enable a rigorous scientific review by the ISRP.

Despite the impressive list of research results, the proposal does not describe progress toward achieving the objectives. The latest report available in Taurus that includes reviewable details about activities associated with this project is the Annual Report for 2016; at that time, results were not yet available for many of the activities supported by this proposal. Still, it is clear that good progress has been made on specific topics such as developing cost-effective genetic methods for assessing parentage, demonstrating successful production of progeny from adult translocations, and identifying species, sex, and population structure in both neutral and adaptive genes. The project proponents have a good record of producing peer-reviewed publications and sharing information with Basin partners. They have also been diligent in their efforts to educate and reach out to the public about the ecological and cultural importance of Pacific lamprey. 

Neither the proposal nor the annual reports describe "lessons learned" or any adaptive management process (i.e., review cycles) by which decisions to alter course would be made. That said, the diversity and time course of results described within this proposal provide some reassurance that the project activities are evolving steadily and creatively as new information is gained and new opportunities are discovered with various partners. 

In sum, this project continues to provide new knowledge on methodological issues and status and trends that will benefit the conservation of Pacific lamprey populations throughout the Columbia Basin and Pacific coast. The development and application of novel genetic methods described in this project are broadly applicable for resolving uncertainties about population structure and the success of adult translocation efforts.

3. Methods: Project Relationships, Work Types, and Deliverables

Together, the proposal and annual reports provide an appropriate overview of methods for the diversity of studies undertaken and cite published literature to justify assertions and support procedures. However, the methods are not described in sufficient detail for a rigorous review, nor is this practical given the large number of different activities subsumed by this project. The project has developed important protocols that are being applied across the Basin; thirteen have been uploaded to the PNAMP web site. 

The proposal contains few details about methods or plans for monitoring and evaluation activities. Many activities supported by this project relate at least indirectly to status and trends monitoring. However, given the diversity of activities associated with this project, it would have been impractical to provide sufficient detail to support a rigorous review of M&E.

Documentation Links:
Review: Fish Accord ISRP Review

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 2008-524-00-ISRP-20100323
Project: 2008-524-00 - Implement Tribal Pacific Lamprey Restoration Plan
Review: Fish Accord ISRP Review
Completed Date: None
First Round ISRP Date: 6/24/2009
First Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria - In Part
First Round ISRP Comment:
This is a proposal to implement four objectives of the Tribal Pacific Lamprey Restoration Plan for the Columbia River Basin. To accomplish this, ten general sub-objectives are identified in this proposal. One task is to finalize the draft lamprey restoration plan. The ISRP believes strongly this objective should be given a priority. Development of the overall tribal lamprey recovery program, including a prioritized list of actions and studies, should precede implementation of field work.

The information in the proposal describing the methodology to undertake the remaining sub-objectives (and associated tasks) is too general to serve as a basis for scientific review. These sub-objectives need a response with additional details.

When viewed as a research and restoration plan, or part of a plan, the proposal could serve as a basis for designing meaningful project components. The proponents need to develop each specific objective from the Tribal Pacific Lamprey Restoration Plan for the Columbia River Basin with the sub-objectives, addressing each of the major elements. As the proposal now stands, it is simply too general. It lacks specific, detailed methodology and study design to be considered scientifically justifiable. The proponents should give serious consideration to prioritizing (with rationale) the myriad of conceivable projects that could fall under the broad “plan” as outlined in the present proposal. It would be helpful if the proponents culled those sub-objectives that would not be funded directly by this project and provided more details on the methods that will be used to address lamprey passage and distribution questions.
Documentation Links:
Review: RME / AP Category Review

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 2008-524-00-NPCC-20110711
Project: 2008-524-00 - Implement Tribal Pacific Lamprey Restoration Plan
Review: RME / AP Category Review
Approved Date: 6/10/2011
Recommendation: Fund (Qualified)
Comments: Implement with conditions through FY 2012 per August 18, 2010 Council decision. In addition, sponsor to address ISRP qualifications (ISRP 2010-44B) by assisting in the development of a synthesis report for ISRP review as described in programmatic issue #8. Implementation beyond FY 2012 based on ISRP and Council reviews of these follow-up actions.
Conditions:
Council Condition #1 Programmatic Issue: RMECAT #8 Lamprey—.

Project Relationships: None

Name Role Organization
Michelle Guay (Inactive) Interested Party Bonneville Power Administration
Siena Lopez-Johnston Project Manager Bonneville Power Administration
Luca De Stefanis Interested Party Bonneville Power Administration
Christine Golightly Interested Party Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC)
Tabatha Rood Env. Compliance Lead Bonneville Power Administration
Chris Roe Interested Party Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC)
Laurie Porter Project Lead Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC)
Mike Matylewich Supervisor Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC)
David Kaplowe Supervisor Bonneville Power Administration