Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program
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Project Summary

Project 2007-217-00 - Walla Walla River Passage Operations and Maintenance (O&M)
Project Number:
2007-217-00
Title:
Walla Walla River Passage Operations and Maintenance (O&M)
Summary:
Operation and maintenance of BPA-Constructed fish passage facilities in the Walla Walla Sub-basin.
Proposer:
None
Proponent Orgs:
Gardena Farms Irrigation District #13 (Govt - Local)
Starting FY:
2007
Ending FY:
2018
Stage:
Implementation - Project Status Report
Area:
Province Subbasin %
Columbia Plateau Walla Walla 100.00%
Purpose:
Habitat
Emphasis:
Restoration/Protection
Focal Species:
All Anadromous Fish
All Anadromous Salmonids
Bass, Largemouth
Bass, Smallmouth
Carp, Common
Catfish
Chinook - All Populations
Chinook - Mid-Columbia River Spring ESU
Crappie, Black
Crappie, White
Freshwater Mussels
Lamprey, Pacific
Lamprey, River
Lamprey, Western Brook
Perch, Yellow
Pikeminnow, Northern
Steelhead - Middle Columbia River DPS
Trout, Brown
Trout, Bull
Trout, Interior Redband
Trout, Rainbow
Whitefish, Mountain
Species Benefit:
Anadromous: 100.0%   Resident: 0.0%   Wildlife: 0.0%
Special:
None

No photos have been uploaded yet for this project.

Summary of Budgets

To view all expenditures for all fiscal years, click "Project Exp. by FY"

Expense SOY Budget Working Budget Contracted Amount Modified Contract Amount Expenditures *
FY2018 (Previous) $166,024 $166,024 $165,890 $165,890 $149,740

BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) $166,024 $165,890 $165,890 $149,740
FY2019 (Current) $0 $132,819 $132,819 $9,140

BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) $0 $132,819 $132,819 $9,140
FY2020 (Next) $0 $0 $0 $0

BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) $0 $0 $0 $0

* Expenditures data includes accruals and are based on data through 31-Oct-2018

Decided Budget Transfers  (FY2018 - FY2020)

Acct FY Acct Type Amount Fund Budget Decision Date
FY2018 Expense $166,024 From: BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) FY18 SOY Budgets 07/17/2017

Pending Budget Decision?  No


Actual Project Cost Share

Current Fiscal Year — 2019
Cost Share Partner Total Proposed Contribution Total Confirmed Contribution
There are no project cost share contributions to show.
Previous Fiscal Years
Fiscal Year Total Contributions % of Budget
2016 (Draft)
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007

Contracts

The table below contains contracts with the following statuses: Active, Complete, History, Issued.
Expense Contracts:
Number Contractor Name Title Status Contracted Amount Dates
CR-327175 SOW 2007-217-00 EXP O&M WALLA WALLA PASSAGE Pending $0
71258 SOW Hudson Bay District Improvement Company 2007-217-00 EXP O&M WALLA WALLA PASSAGE Issued $83,012 1/1/2016 - 12/31/2016
77884 SOW Hudson Bay District Improvement Company 2007-217-00 EXP O&M WALLA WALLA PASSAGE Issued $83,012 1/1/2018 - 12/31/2018
78475 SOW Gardena Farms Irrigation District #13 2007-217-00 EXP O&M WALLA WALLA PASSAGE Issued $82,878 3/1/2018 - 2/28/2019
CR-327174 SOW Hudson Bay District Improvement Company 2007-217-00 EXP O&M WALLA WALLA PASSAGE Pending $66,409 1/1/2019 - 12/31/2019
CR-329924 SOW Gardena Farms Irrigation District #13 2007-217-00 EXP WALLA WALLA PASSAGE O&M - GARDENA FARMS Pending $66,410 3/1/2019 - 2/29/2020



Annual Progress Reports
Expected (since FY2004):26
Completed:21
On time:21
Status Reports
Completed:95
On time:40
Avg Days Late:25

Earliest Subsequent           Accepted Count of Contract Deliverables
Contract Contract(s) Title Contractor Start End Status Reports Complete Green Yellow Red Total % Green and Complete Canceled
30073 34511, 40085, 44452, 50124, 54742, 59944, 62738, 66665, 70220, 75593, 78475 200721700 EXP O&M - GARDENA & GARDEN CITY/LOWDEN 2 FACILITIES Gardena Farms Irrigation District #13 10/2006 10/2006 Issued 48 64 6 0 5 75 93.33% 1
30685 36027, 45683, 51093, 55771, 60619, 64045, 67674, 71258, 74860, 77884 200721700 EXP O&M - NURSERY BRIDGE & LITTLE WALLA2 FACILITIES Hudson Bay District Improvement Company 01/2007 01/2007 Pending 47 61 4 0 3 68 95.59% 0
Project Totals 95 125 10 0 8 143 94.41% 1


The table content is updated frequently and thus contains more recent information than what was in the original proposal reviewed by ISRP and Council.

Review: 2013 Geographic Category Review

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 2007-217-00-NPCC-20131126
Project: 2007-217-00 - Walla Walla River Passage Operations and Maintenance (O&M)
Review: 2013 Geographic Category Review
Proposal: GEOREV-2007-217-00
Proposal State: Pending BPA Response
Approved Date: 11/5/2013
Recommendation: Implement with Conditions
Comments: Implement through FY 2018. See Programmatic Issue and Recommendations for long term maintenance.
Conditions:
Council Condition #1 Programmatic Issue: C. Provide Long-term Maintenance of Fish Screens—See Programmatic Issue and Recommendations for long term maintenance.

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 2007-217-00-ISRP-20130610
Project: 2007-217-00 - Walla Walla River Passage Operations and Maintenance (O&M)
Review: 2013 Geographic Category Review
Proposal Number: GEOREV-2007-217-00
Completed Date: 6/12/2013
Final Round ISRP Date: 6/10/2013
Final Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria
Final Round ISRP Comment:

The maintenance of the passage and screening facilities on the Walla Walla River will contribute to improved survival of adult and juvenile salmonids in this system. The proposal does a good job describing the maintenance problems and the methods being used to correct problems. Like other passage structure projects, the sponsors should look into the opportunity to use the facilities for juvenile migrant enumeration.

1. Purpose: Significance to Regional Programs, Technical Background, and Objectives

The purpose of this proposal is to obtain support to maintain four fish-passage and diversion screen installations in the Walla Walla River. The issues with fish passage at these sites and a summary of the history of the installation and improvements of the screens and ladders was adequately described. The objective of this project is to manage and maintain these installations. These facilities have had a positive impact on adult and juvenile survival of migrating salmonids and their maintenance will be critical to recovery of steelhead and the success of the spring Chinook re-introduction effort.

While maintaining these facilities, the sponsors also cooperate with ongoing M&E efforts including helping the USFWS preserve its PIT tag arrays. Also when passage facilities are shut down for routine maintenance they perform fish salvage operations. For example, Brook and Pacific Lamprey juveniles are often recovered in mud deposits adjacent to irrigation screens. These fish are returned back to the river. A variety of material including large woody debris needs to be removed from the passage and diversion facilities. The sponsors use guidelines in the BiOp to determine what can be removed from the river what should be returned. An ongoing challenge is budgeting for equipment replacement.

2. History: Accomplishments, Results, and Adaptive Management (Evaluation of Results)

Since their construction the Hudson Bay District Improvement Company (HBDIC) and Gardena Farms Irrigation District (GFID) have operated and maintained the fish ladders and diversions located at the Little Walla Walla River, Nursery Bridge, Gardena, and Garden City/Lowden. Silt and other debris move throughout the Walla Walla River. This project removes debris from dam forebays and tailraces, fish ladder entrances, slots, and exits. It also cleans diversion channels, screens and bypass structures. During the irrigation season, project personnel make daily visits to these facilities inspecting them for damage and debris loads to ensure that flows and water levels meet operating criteria. Standard maintenance is also performed and flow and water level data are recorded. The project does engage in adaptive management as flow and water use conditions affect maintenance cycles. In addition operating criteria and infrastructure at the sites are changed as needed to facilitate fish passage.

Evaluation of Results

Inadequate upstream and downstream passage were largely responsible for the extirpation of spring Chinook and decline in abundance of summer steelhead in the Walla Walla subbasin. The subbasin plan for the Walla Walla identified fish passage improvement as a critical factor for salmon and steelhead restoration. In the mid 1990s the CTUIR requested that outdated fish screening and passage facilities in the Walla Walla subbasin be replaced. Shortly thereafter, BPA, Walla Walla Irrigation Districts, NOAA Fisheries, WDFW, ODFW, WDOE, and the CTUIR met to establish easement agreements, develop, review and modify plans for passage facilities, and inspect on-site work. From 1999 to 2003 four significant fish passage facilities were built in the Walla Walla subbasin. Two of them, the Little Walla Walla River Diversion and Passage facility and Nursery Bridge fish ladder are operated and maintained by the Hudson Bay District Improvement Company (HBDIC). The Gardena Farms Irrigation District (GFID) operates and maintains the remaining two projects, the Gardena or Burlingame fish ladder and the Garden City/Lowden #2 diversion. Flow conditions, water withdrawals for irrigation and other factors can affect up- and downstream passage through these structures. For the past 10 to 14 years the GFID and HBDIC irrigation districts have been maintaining and operating these facilities.

The successful re-introduction of spring Chinook salmon by the CTUIR into the Walla Walla subbasin indicates that both upstream and downstream passage has been significantly improved. Spring Chinook had been extirpated from the Walla Walla River since 1925. Their disappearance was due to the construction of the Nine Mile (Reese) Dam in 1905 which caused the Walla Walla River to run dry each summer. In 2001, an agreement was reached among three irrigation districts, the Umatilla Tribe, and federal agencies that allowed year-around water flows to occur in the Walla Walla River. The spring Chinook reintroduction program began in 2000 and the first adults returned in 2004. Since then returns of spring Chinook into the upper Walla Walla River and Mill Creek have increased from 200 adults in 2004 to 1,135 in 2009 (CRITFC web page). This program has benefitted from the flow agreement and the operation and maintenance of the four fish passage facilities performed by the HBDIC and GFID.

3. Project Relationships, Emerging Limiting Factors, and Tailored Questions

Project personnel work closely with Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations staff to coordinate canal startups and shutdowns, fish removal operations, screen inspections, annual heavy equipment use, and debris removal from fish ladders, screens, and diversion channels. WDFW and ODFW are also consulted and involved with the approval of annual operation and maintenance plans. NOAA Fisheries, WDOE, the Walla Walla Basin Watershed Council, Walla Walla Habitat Conservation Plan, and Walla Walla Watershed management Partnership also interact with project staff.

The project focuses on O&M at four existing fish passage and screening facilities. Monitoring for these facilities is limited to maintaining a log of operational and maintenance issues encountered during each site visit. These records provide information useful in improving project operation. This type of monitoring is adequate for the project objectives.

No emerging limiting factors were listed. However climate change may produce more frequent extreme storm events which could impact the operation and maintenance of the project’s fish passage structures. Have any risk analyses been performed to estimate how the structures might perform under extreme conditions? For example, will extreme precipitation events put the structures at risk? Perhaps some floodplains above the barriers can be established to increase storage? Similarly in the case of low precipitation events, will there be enough water in the entire system for the fish passage devices to work? Another potential emerging limiting factor is the projected lifetime of fish passage and irrigation diversion structures. Are regular reviews undertaken to determine when or if existing structures should be updated? If updates are required how will planning, design, and implementation costs be covered?

4. Deliverables, Work Elements, Metrics, and Methods

The project has one deliverable, to operate and maintain BPA’s Walla Walla fish passage facilities per NOAA guidelines. To accomplish that, regular daily visits and inspections are conducted along with routine annual maintenance work. Water flow and height data are collected at each site and recorded in site-specific log books. The work elements are all related to the maintenance and repair of the facilities. They are adequately described and appropriate.

Specific comments on protocols and methods described in MonitoringMethods.org

No RM&E protocols were listed.

First Round ISRP Date: 6/10/2013
First Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria
First Round ISRP Comment:

The maintenance of the passage and screening facilities on the Walla Walla River will contribute to improved survival of adult and juvenile salmonids in this system. The proposal does a good job describing the maintenance problems and the methods being used to correct problems. Like other passage structure projects, the sponsors should look into the opportunity to use the facilities for juvenile migrant enumeration.

1. Purpose: Significance to Regional Programs, Technical Background, and Objectives

The purpose of this proposal is to obtain support to maintain four fish-passage and diversion screen installations in the Walla Walla River. The issues with fish passage at these sites and a summary of the history of the installation and improvements of the screens and ladders was adequately described. The objective of this project is to manage and maintain these installations. These facilities have had a positive impact on adult and juvenile survival of migrating salmonids and their maintenance will be critical to recovery of steelhead and the success of the spring Chinook re-introduction effort.

While maintaining these facilities, the sponsors also cooperate with ongoing M&E efforts including helping the USFWS preserve its PIT tag arrays. Also when passage facilities are shut down for routine maintenance they perform fish salvage operations. For example, Brook and Pacific Lamprey juveniles are often recovered in mud deposits adjacent to irrigation screens. These fish are returned back to the river. A variety of material including large woody debris needs to be removed from the passage and diversion facilities. The sponsors use guidelines in the BiOp to determine what can be removed from the river what should be returned. An ongoing challenge is budgeting for equipment replacement.

2. History: Accomplishments, Results, and Adaptive Management (Evaluation of Results)

Since their construction the Hudson Bay District Improvement Company (HBDIC) and Gardena Farms Irrigation District (GFID) have operated and maintained the fish ladders and diversions located at the Little Walla Walla River, Nursery Bridge, Gardena, and Garden City/Lowden. Silt and other debris move throughout the Walla Walla River. This project removes debris from dam forebays and tailraces, fish ladder entrances, slots, and exits. It also cleans diversion channels, screens and bypass structures. During the irrigation season, project personnel make daily visits to these facilities inspecting them for damage and debris loads to ensure that flows and water levels meet operating criteria. Standard maintenance is also performed and flow and water level data are recorded. The project does engage in adaptive management as flow and water use conditions affect maintenance cycles. In addition operating criteria and infrastructure at the sites are changed as needed to facilitate fish passage.

Evaluation of Results

Inadequate upstream and downstream passage were largely responsible for the extirpation of spring Chinook and decline in abundance of summer steelhead in the Walla Walla subbasin. The subbasin plan for the Walla Walla identified fish passage improvement as a critical factor for salmon and steelhead restoration. In the mid 1990s the CTUIR requested that outdated fish screening and passage facilities in the Walla Walla subbasin be replaced. Shortly thereafter, BPA, Walla Walla Irrigation Districts, NOAA Fisheries, WDFW, ODFW, WDOE, and the CTUIR met to establish easement agreements, develop, review and modify plans for passage facilities, and inspect on-site work. From 1999 to 2003 four significant fish passage facilities were built in the Walla Walla subbasin. Two of them, the Little Walla Walla River Diversion and Passage facility and Nursery Bridge fish ladder are operated and maintained by the Hudson Bay District Improvement Company (HBDIC). The Gardena Farms Irrigation District (GFID) operates and maintains the remaining two projects, the Gardena or Burlingame fish ladder and the Garden City/Lowden #2 diversion. Flow conditions, water withdrawals for irrigation and other factors can affect up- and downstream passage through these structures. For the past 10 to 14 years the GFID and HBDIC irrigation districts have been maintaining and operating these facilities.

The successful re-introduction of spring Chinook salmon by the CTUIR into the Walla Walla subbasin indicates that both upstream and downstream passage has been significantly improved. Spring Chinook had been extirpated from the Walla Walla River since 1925. Their disappearance was due to the construction of the Nine Mile (Reese) Dam in 1905 which caused the Walla Walla River to run dry each summer. In 2001, an agreement was reached among three irrigation districts, the Umatilla Tribe, and federal agencies that allowed year-around water flows to occur in the Walla Walla River. The spring Chinook reintroduction program began in 2000 and the first adults returned in 2004. Since then returns of spring Chinook into the upper Walla Walla River and Mill Creek have increased from 200 adults in 2004 to 1,135 in 2009 (CRITFC web page). This program has benefitted from the flow agreement and the operation and maintenance of the four fish passage facilities performed by the HBDIC and GFID.

3. Project Relationships, Emerging Limiting Factors, and Tailored Questions

Project personnel work closely with Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations staff to coordinate canal startups and shutdowns, fish removal operations, screen inspections, annual heavy equipment use, and debris removal from fish ladders, screens, and diversion channels. WDFW and ODFW are also consulted and involved with the approval of annual operation and maintenance plans. NOAA Fisheries, WDOE, the Walla Walla Basin Watershed Council, Walla Walla Habitat Conservation Plan, and Walla Walla Watershed management Partnership also interact with project staff.

The project focuses on O&M at four existing fish passage and screening facilities. Monitoring for these facilities is limited to maintaining a log of operational and maintenance issues encountered during each site visit. These records provide information useful in improving project operation. This type of monitoring is adequate for the project objectives.

No emerging limiting factors were listed. However climate change may produce more frequent extreme storm events which could impact the operation and maintenance of the project’s fish passage structures. Have any risk analyses been performed to estimate how the structures might perform under extreme conditions? For example, will extreme precipitation events put the structures at risk? Perhaps some floodplains above the barriers can be established to increase storage? Similarly in the case of low precipitation events, will there be enough water in the entire system for the fish passage devices to work? Another potential emerging limiting factor is the projected lifetime of fish passage and irrigation diversion structures. Are regular reviews undertaken to determine when or if existing structures should be updated? If updates are required how will planning, design, and implementation costs be covered?

4. Deliverables, Work Elements, Metrics, and Methods

The project has one deliverable, to operate and maintain BPA’s Walla Walla fish passage facilities per NOAA guidelines. To accomplish that, regular daily visits and inspections are conducted along with routine annual maintenance work. Water flow and height data are collected at each site and recorded in site-specific log books. The work elements are all related to the maintenance and repair of the facilities. They are adequately described and appropriate.

Specific comments on protocols and methods described in MonitoringMethods.org

No RM&E protocols were listed.

Modified by Dal Marsters on 6/12/2013 9:37:09 AM.
Documentation Links:
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 2007-217-00-NPCC-20090924
Project: 2007-217-00 - Walla Walla River Passage Operations and Maintenance (O&M)
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Approved Date: 10/23/2006
Recommendation: Fund
Comments: ISRP fundable qualified: sponsors should address the ISRP M&E comments the next time they report to Bonneville (copy to Council staff). Recommend that sponsors and Bonneville consider combining this project w/ 200003300 and find budget efficiencies

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 2007-217-00-ISRP-20060831
Project: 2007-217-00 - Walla Walla River Passage Operations and Maintenance (O&M)
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 8/31/2006
Final Round ISRP Date: None
Final Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria (Qualified)
Final Round ISRP Comment:
See ISRP comments on 199601100 - Walla Walla Juvenile and Adult Passage Improvements.
Documentation Links:

Legal Assessment (In-Lieu)

Assessment Number: 2007-217-00-INLIEU-20090521
Project Number: 2007-217-00
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 10/6/2006
In Lieu Rating: No Problems Exist
Cost Share Rating: None
Comment: O&M on BPA-constructed screens; assume BPA has already agreed to fund.

Capital Assessment

Assessment Number: 2007-217-00-CAPITAL-20090618
Project Number: 2007-217-00
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 2/27/2007
Capital Rating: Does Not Qualify for Capital Funding
Capital Asset Category: None
Comment: None

Project Relationships: None

Name Role Organization
John Zerba Project Lead Hudson Bay District Improvement Company
Peter Lofy Supervisor Bonneville Power Administration
Katey Grange Env. Compliance Lead Bonneville Power Administration
Travis Eilertson Project Lead Gardena Farms Irrigation District #13
Hannah Dondy-Kaplan Project Manager Bonneville Power Administration