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Project Summary

Project 2003-011-00 - Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration
Project Number:
2003-011-00
Title:
Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration
Summary:
The mission of the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership’ s Habitat Restoration Program is to implement and monitor strategic, well-coordinated, scientifically sound projects designed to rehabilitate, enhance, protect, conserve, create, and restore 16,000 acres tidal wetlands and other key habitats to support native species using the Lower Columbia River estuary from the river’s mouth to Bonneville Dam, with a special emphasis on ESA listed species, and other focal species described in the Comprehensive Conservation Management Plan and the sub-basin plan.
Proposer:
None
Proponent Orgs:
Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (Non-Profit)
Starting FY:
2003
Ending FY:
2019
BPA PM:
Stage:
Implementation - Project Status Report
Area:
Province Subbasin %
Columbia River Estuary Columbia Estuary 50.00%
Lower Columbia Columbia Lower 50.00%
Purpose:
Habitat
Emphasis:
Restoration/Protection
Focal Species:
All Anadromous Fish
All Anadromous Salmonids
Bass, Largemouth
Bass, Smallmouth
Carp, Common
Catfish
Chinook - All Populations
Chinook - Deschutes River Summer/Fall ESU
Chinook - Lower Columbia River ESU
Chinook - Mid-Columbia River Spring ESU
Chinook - Snake River Fall ESU
Chinook - Snake River Spring/Summer
Chinook - Snake River Spring/Summer ESU
Chinook - Upper Columbia River Spring ESU
Chinook - Upper Columbia River Summer/Fall ESU
Chinook - Upper Willamette River ESU
Chum - Columbia River ESU
Coho - Lower Columbia River ESU
Coho - Unspecified Population
Crappie, Black
Crappie, White
Cutthroat Trout, Coastal - All Anadromous Populations
Cutthroat Trout, Coastal - Resident Populations
Cutthroat Trout, Coastal - Southwest Washington/Columbia River ESU
Freshwater Mussels
Lamprey, Pacific
Lamprey, River
Lamprey, Western Brook
Perch, Yellow
Pikeminnow, Northern
Sockeye - All Populations
Sockeye - Lake Wenatchee ESU
Sockeye - Okanogan River ESU
Sockeye - Snake River ESU
Steelhead - All Populations
Steelhead - Lower Columbia River DPS
Steelhead - Middle Columbia River DPS
Steelhead - Snake River DPS
Steelhead - Upper Columbia River DPS
Steelhead - Upper Willamette River DPS
Sturgeon, Green
Sturgeon, White - All Populations except Kootenai R. DPS
Sturgeon, White - Lower Columbia River
Trout, Bull
Walleye
Whitefish, Mountain
Wildlife
Species Benefit:
Anadromous: 100.0%   Resident: 0.0%   Wildlife: 0.0%
Special:
None

Location of levee breach and new channel.

Figure Name: Figure 8

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 20

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Construction activities at Mill Road site.

Figure Name: Figure 9

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 21

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Completed breach location and new channel.

Figure Name: Figure 10

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 21

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Otter Point project site.

Figure Name: Figure 11

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 22

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Setback levee construction.

Figure Name: Figure 12

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 24

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Estuary Partnership Study Area.

Figure Name: Figure 1

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 7

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Germany Creek project location.

Figure Name: Figure 2

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 15

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Dolo-timber structure construction.

Figure Name: Figure 3

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 16

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Completed dolo-timber structure.

Figure Name: Figure 4

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 17

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Grays River acquisition and restoration sites.

Figure Name: Figure 5

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 18

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Mill Road project location.

Figure Name: Figure 6

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 18

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Mill Road project site.

Figure Name: Figure 7

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 19

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Completed channel with large woody debris.

Figure Name: Figure 13

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 24

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Sandy River Delta project location and restoration site.

Figure Name: Figure 14

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 25

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Project site – pre-restoration.

Figure Name: Figure 15

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 26

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Project site – post-restoration.

Figure Name: Figure 16

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 27

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Deer Island project location.

Figure Name: Figure 17

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 28

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Tidegates on South Deer Island Slough.

Figure Name: Figure 18

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 29

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Carr Slough project site

Figure Name: Appendix B-Figure 1

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 48

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Louisiana Swamp project site

Figure Name: Appendix B-Figure 2

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 49

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Honeyman Creek project site

Figure Name: Appendix B-Figure 3

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 50

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

Thousand Acres project site

Figure Name: Appendix B-Figure 4

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 51

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786

East Fork Lewis River project site

Figure Name: Appendix B-Figure 5

Document ID: P126538

Document: Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration; 9/10 - 12/11

Page Number: 51

Project: 2003-011-00

Contract: 54786


Summary of Budgets

To view all expenditures for all fiscal years, click "Project Exp. by FY"

Expense SOY Budget Working Budget Contracted Amount Modified Contract Amount Expenditures *
FY2017 (Previous) $1,046,099 $2,005,807 $20,396 $2,305,416 $1,722,212

BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) $2,005,807 $20,396 $2,305,416 $1,722,212
FY2018 (Current) $1,553,416 $1,547,530 $2,920,152 $1,531,035 $1,798,886

BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) $1,547,530 $2,920,152 $1,531,035 $1,798,886
FY2019 (Next) $4,717,515 $4,717,515 $0 $1,459,826 $0

BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) $4,717,515 $0 $1,459,826 $0

* Expenditures data includes accruals and are based on data through 31-Aug-2018

Decided Budget Transfers  (FY2017 - FY2019)

Acct FY Acct Type Amount Fund Budget Decision Date
FY2017 Expense $900,000 From: BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) Establish FY17 Estuary Start of Year Budget 04/19/2016
FY2017 Expense $146,099 From: BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) Adjust Estuary project budgets (5/2/2016) 05/04/2016
FY2017 Expense $947,708 From: BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) Estuary Budget Transfers (12/22/2016) 12/22/2016
FY2017 Expense $12,000 From: BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) Estuary Budget Transfers (3/23/17) 05/18/2017
FY2018 Expense $1,553,416 From: BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) FY18 Estuary Budgets (EP) 9/5/17 09/05/2017
FY2018 Expense $5,886 To: BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) Estuary Budget Transfers (3/7/18) 03/07/2018
FY2019 Expense $4,717,515 From: BiOp FCRPS 2008 (non-Accord) August FY18 Transfers 08/24/2018

Pending Budget Decision?  No


Actual Project Cost Share

Current Fiscal Year — 2018   DRAFT
Cost Share Partner Total Proposed Contribution Total Confirmed Contribution
There are no project cost share contributions to show.
Previous Fiscal Years
Fiscal Year Total Contributions % of Budget
2017 $182,326 (Draft) 8 % (Draft)
2016 $199,816 (Draft) 7 % (Draft)
2015 $1,400,000 30 %
2014 $4,776,916 (Draft) 73 % (Draft)
2013 $3,946,308 (Draft) 63 % (Draft)
2012 $4,258,821 (Draft) 53 % (Draft)
2011 $2,665,689 (Draft) 46 % (Draft)
2010
2009 $3,413,276 (Draft) 51 % (Draft)
2008 $1,503,135 (Draft) 35 % (Draft)
2007 $2,894,548 (Draft) 60 % (Draft)

Contracts

The table below contains contracts with the following statuses: Active, Complete, History, Issued.
Expense Contracts:
Number Contractor Name Title Status Contracted Amount Dates
6388 REL 57 SOW Applied Archaeological Research ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES FIELD SURVEY AND LITERATURE REVIEW History $17,565 4/14/2004 - 5/7/2004
20563 SOW Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership 2003-011-00 IMPLEMENT HABITAT RESTORATION FOR COLUMBIA R. ESTUARY History $679,321 11/1/2004 - 10/31/2005
25875 SOW Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership 2003-011-00 EXP IMPLEMENT HABITAT RESTORATION FOR COL. R/EST 06 History $597,779 11/1/2005 - 10/31/2006
29538 SOW Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership 2003-011-00 EXP IMPLEMENT HABITAT RESTORATION FOR COL. R/EST 06 History $896,867 9/15/2006 - 9/30/2007
BPA-003636 Bonneville Power Administration 2007 Estuary Habitat Land Acquisition and Land Support Active $1,538 10/1/2006 - 9/30/2007
BPA-003466 Bonneville Power Administration 2008 Estuary Habitat Land Acquisition and TBL Active $71,861 10/1/2007 - 9/30/2008
BPA-004277 Bonneville Power Administration 2009 Land Acquisitions Active $626,648 10/1/2008 - 9/30/2009
BPA-005031 Bonneville Power Administration FY10 Columbia River/Estuary Habitat Active $713 10/1/2009 - 9/30/2010
BPA-005491 Bonneville Power Administration 2011 Estuary Habitat Land Acquisition and TBL Active $6,994 10/1/2010 - 9/30/2011
BPA-006191 Bonneville Power Administration Columbia River/Estuary Habitat Active $963,182 10/1/2011 - 9/30/2012
BPA-008506 Bonneville Power Administration FY15 Land Acquisitions Active $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015
BPA-008630 Bonneville Power Administration 2016 Estuary Habitat Land Acquisition Active $2,519 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016
71597 SOW Tetra Tech, Inc. STEIGERWALD FLOODPLAIN RESTORATION EA Issued $212,127 1/29/2016 - 12/31/2018
BPA-009136 Bonneville Power Administration FY17 Land Acquisitions Active $20,396 10/1/2016 - 9/30/2017
77262 SOW Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership 2003-011-00 EXP COLUMBIA R ESTUARY HABITAT-- RESTORATION (EP) Issued $2,504,531 10/1/2017 - 9/30/2019
77263 SOW Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership 2003-011-00 EXP COLUMBIA R/ESTUARY HABITAT-- COORDINATION (EP) Issued $415,121 10/1/2017 - 9/30/2019
BPA-010318 Bonneville Power Administration FY18 Land Acquisitions Active $500 10/1/2017 - 9/30/2018
BPA-010605 Bonneville Power Administration FY19 Land Aquisitions/other Active $0 10/1/2018 - 9/30/2019



Annual Progress Reports
Expected (since FY2004):24
Completed:21
On time:19
Status Reports
Completed:94
On time:53
Avg Days Late:29

Earliest Subsequent           Accepted Count of Contract Deliverables
Contract Contract(s) Title Contractor Start End Status Reports Complete Green Yellow Red Total % Green and Complete Canceled
15125 20563, 25875, 29538, 35012, 40605, 45815, 51120, 54786, 62794, 70379, 77263, 77262 2003-011-00 IMPLEMENT HABITAT RESTORATION PROGRAM FOR COL R/EST Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership 09/2003 09/2003 Issued 64 278 19 0 26 323 91.95% 9
BPA-003636 2007 Estuary Habitat Land Acquisition and Land Support Bonneville Power Administration 10/2006 10/2006 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-003466 2008 Estuary Habitat Land Acquisition and TBL Bonneville Power Administration 10/2007 10/2007 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
40221 43868 2003-011-00 EXP COLUMBIA R/ESTUARY HABITAT (TRASK & ASSOC.) PC Trask and Associates 09/2008 09/2008 Closed 8 8 0 0 0 8 100.00% 0
41081 45817 2003-011-00 EXP COLUMBIA R/ESTUARY HABITAT (PILE) Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership 09/2008 09/2008 Closed 9 12 0 0 3 15 80.00% 0
BPA-004277 2009 Land Acquisitions Bonneville Power Administration 10/2008 10/2008 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
43516 2003-011-00 EXP PILE (USGS) COLUMBIA R/ESTUARY HABITAT US Geological Survey (USGS) 07/2009 07/2009 Closed 2 3 0 0 3 6 50.00% 0
44219 2003-011-00 EXP CLT COLUMBIA R/ESTUARY HABITAT Columbia Land Trust 09/2009 09/2009 Closed 6 7 0 0 0 7 100.00% 0
BPA-005031 FY10 Columbia River/Estuary Habitat Bonneville Power Administration 10/2009 10/2009 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-005491 2011 Estuary Habitat Land Acquisition and TBL Bonneville Power Administration 10/2010 10/2010 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-006191 Columbia River/Estuary Habitat Bonneville Power Administration 10/2011 10/2011 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
57839 2003-011-00 EXP USGS COLUMBIA R/ESTUARY HABITAT US Geological Survey (USGS) 07/2012 07/2012 Closed 5 0 0 0 2 2 0.00% 0
BPA-008506 FY15 Land Acquisitions Bonneville Power Administration 10/2014 10/2014 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-008630 2016 Estuary Habitat Land Acquisition Bonneville Power Administration 10/2015 10/2015 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
BPA-009136 FY17 Land Acquisitions Bonneville Power Administration 10/2016 10/2016 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-010318 FY18 Land Acquisitions Bonneville Power Administration 10/2017 10/2017 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-010605 FY19 Land Aquisitions/other Bonneville Power Administration 10/2018 10/2018 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Project Totals 94 308 19 0 34 361 90.58% 10


Review: 2013 Geographic Category Review

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 2003-011-00-ISRP-20130610
Project: 2003-011-00 - Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration
Review: 2013 Geographic Category Review
Proposal Number: GEOREV-2003-011-00
Completed Date: 9/26/2013
Final Round ISRP Date: 8/15/2013
Final Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria (Qualified)
Final Round ISRP Comment:

General observations

The Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership provided a comprehensive and thoughtful response to our questions. The Partnership indicated that they are currently focusing on activities that restore fish access and improve habitat that has been cut-off from the mainstem Columbia. In addition, they and their partners are working to combine multiple actions to create larger projects. The roles of the various partners were clearly presented and are coordinated to avoid conflicts over project management and actions. The partners include the Columbia Land Trust, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Cowlitz Indian Tribe, the Partnership, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce. The Partnership is currently developing a broader ecosystem approach for its restoration activities. A description of this method was provided, and it will be used in the future to prioritize areas in the lower Columbia that should be protected or restored.

The Partnership indicated that the AEMR approach it is using (Johnson et al. 2013) to evaluate its projects is a work in progress and they would be receptive to a review of the document by the ISRP if needed. An AEMR leadership team has been created. Since BPA staff members are on the leadership team the sponsors state that the results of their monitoring work will be coordinated with ISEMP, CHaMP, and BPA’s AEM methods so that project data can be used in basinwide analyses. The methods used to determine the level of monitoring each project will receive were described in adequate detail. Some additional discussion about how the Partnership’s 51 reference areas will be used was not addressed. Use of these sites should be indicated in future AEMR designs for the Partnership’s projects.

The Partnership is seeking funding to include socio-economics in its project selection process. Currently it receives no funding for outreach and signage. We recommend that the sponsors work with their partners to include signage as a project endpoint to educate the public on what restoration work was done and the biological benefits it is designed to create. This will be a valuable addition to the significant amount of public education that the Partnership does through its school and volunteer programs.

Comment on specific responses

Question 1: In response to ISRP's concern about monitoring, the sponsors stated the Johnson et al. (2013) plan for AEMR monitoring in the estuary is in a pilot phase of implementation. A qualification is to provide the results of this pilot project as soon as they are available.

Question 2: The integration of the 50+ reference sites into the monitoring program is impressive. In general this appears to be a well thought out RM&E program. In response to the ISRP question about the criteria for determining the level of monitoring needed by a project, the description provided of the scoring method used for selection was adequate but should be qualified. A qualification is to provide some examples of how monitoring sites were justified (including statistical or rating scores) to help understand how these sites were selected.

In response to the question asking for an elaboration of the methods used to select monitoring sites, the sponsor responded that “the proposal format for the ISRP Geographic Review was problematic in that it did not allow for a description of our technical approach.” This seems a programmatic issue that should be addressed, perhaps by enabling appendices to proposals. Note, a reference is to Roni et al. 2002, but this is probably a typo that should be Roni 2005.

Question 3: This question concerned the scientific basis for the numerical goal of acres to be restored. The sponsors stated that the numerical goal for restoration is based on opportunism and the anticipated pace of restoration. What the ISRP was asking for was the biological rationale behind their restoration actions—what are the anticipated biological benefits associated with restoring 25,000 acres and is more protection and restoration needed? The answer was only partially adequate, and the ISRP suggests the sponsor survey the scientific literature for possible methods (e.g. modeling) to improve the scientific basis for establishing targets for restoration and employing more suitable metrics. A good description of the rate of restoration in the estuary was provided.

Question 4: The flow chart was very useful to understand the procedures for restoration site selection. A final metric is an economic/ecological mixture ($/SBU), which puts considerable weight on the veracity of SBU determination. The ISRP should be kept informed as results of restoration are developed and expressed as SBUs.

The ISRP also requested information on how or if a landscape approach was included in site selection, but the response was only partially adequate. The physical landscape is clearly considered in the procedure. However, while numerous partners are consulted, the socioeconomic aspects of a true landscape approach (ISAB 2011-4) do not appear to be addressed or incorporated in the current process.

Question 5: More details were requested on the annual goal of starting and managing four to eight new habitat restoration projects. The response was adequate.

Question 6: Information was requested on chemical analysis of adult Chinook otoliths, a subproject proposed to resolve a critical uncertainty. The question was not answered directly. The ISRP was referred to a draft publication by Roegner et al. 2013, but no link was provided to this document. A short explanation for how barium and strontium deposition in otoliths are being used to estimate body size at estuary entry and residence times would have been useful.

Question 7: This question related to a proposed habitat suitability index for juvenile salmonids in the estuary and on how its use can be justified in an Ecosystem Management approach. The response was partially adequate. The index was explained and shows promise to be useful. However, its role in an ecosystem management approach was not fully explained and justified.

Question 8: The ISRP asked what is the working definition that LCREP uses for resilience?

The response was adequate although the definition offered by Holling (1973) is rather more restricted than the contemporary meaning described in the ISAB report, Using a Comprehensive Landscape Approach for More Effective Conservation and Restoration (ISAB 2011-4, 179 pages).

Qualification #1 - ISRP or ISAB would like to review the final plan
In response to ISRP's concern about AEMR monitoring (Question 1), the sponsors stated the Johnson et al. (2013) plan is in a pilot phase of implementation. This document answered a number of important questions regarding the design and rationale for monitoring the effectiveness of the estuary restoration projects. However, because it was a draft, the ISRP or ISAB would like to review the final plan when it is available. An estimated date for completion of the pilot project is also requested.
Qualification #2 - Please provide details of how the 51 reference monitoring sites were selected and justified
Please provide details of how the 51 reference monitoring sites were selected and justified (including statistical or rating scores) and any explanatory material that will help to understand how these sites were selected (Question 2). This should be included in the finalized AEMR monitoring plan per Johnson et al. (2013).
First Round ISRP Date: 6/10/2013
First Round ISRP Rating: Response Requested
First Round ISRP Comment:

The ISRP requests a response on following issues:

1) Does the sponsor plan to use the AEM methods recently produced by Roni et al. (2013) in their Action Effectiveness Monitoring of Tributary Habitat Improvement: a Programmatic Approach for the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program? If so how will they use them and how does the Roni et al. (2013) report relate to the Johnson et al. (2013) report on estuary monitoring? What is the status of the Johnson et al. (2013) plan and how close is it to being implemented?

Johnson, G., Corbett, C., Doumbia, J., Schwartz, M., Scranton, R., and C. Studebaker (2013) Draft programmatic plan for restoration action effectiveness monitoring and research in the Lower Columbia River estuary . AEMR Plan version January 29 2013. 31 p. (circulated by LCREP representative Catherine Corbett to review members on March 20 2013) 

Roni, P., R. Scranton, J. O’Neal. 2013. Action Effectiveness Monitoring of Tributary Habitat Improvement: a Programmatic Approach for the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Watershed Program, Fisheries Ecology Division Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries. Seattle, WA.

2) What are the criteria for determining the level of monitoring needed by a project?

3) The project has a measurable goal to restore 25,000 acres by 2025 which is commendable. What is the scientific basis for this goal?

4) A flow chart to help understand the procedures for choosing sites to be restored is requested. Details of community involvement in keeping with a true landscape approach would be particularly useful.

5) More details are requested on the annual goal of starting and managing four to eight new habitat restoration projects. It appears that the Partnership performs some of its own habitat restoration work, mainly in the area that lies upstream from Portland to the Bonneville Dam. How many of the new projects will be directly undertaken by the Partnership, and where will they take place?

6) “Chemical analysis of adult Chinook otoliths from Grays, Coweeman, Lewis, Willamette, Sandy, Priest Rapids, Wenatchee, and Methow; Water chemistry of tidal tributary and main-stem sites to evaluate whether otolith barium can be used to reconstruct salmon entry into tidal-fresh environments; consider strontium marking pending results from 2011 analysis” is a very key objective under “critical uncertainties” and more information is required. What is the design of this work?

7) The Habitat Suitability Index (HIS) may be incompatible with the ecosystem approach advocated by the sponsor and often thought to be problematic in its application to the real world (Petts 2009). Further details are requested on how it can be justified in an Ecosystem Management approach. 

8) The sponsors advocate the incorporation of difficult ecological variables in their Ecosystem Management approach but offer few definitions or ways to measure them. For example resilience which is used 7 times in the proposal either as a deliverable or a scoring attribute. What is the working definition that LCREP uses for resilience?

Also see the ISRP’s programmatic comments for the estuary projects.

1. Purpose: Significance to Regional Programs, Technical Background, and Objectives

The project is key to Columbia River estuary restorations programs as it is, as the sponsors state," the umbrella of the “umbrella projects.” Therefore it is very significant to regional programs and is clearly connected to CREST, Columbia Land Trust, Watershed Councils and other related estuarine projects.

The objectives are well stated. The technical background is comprehensive, but the narrative could be improved by clearly stating the uncertainties that are based in lack of scientific knowledge.

Ecosystem management is stated to be a backbone of the project, but some aspects of ecosystem management are poorly known and no definitions of them in the context of the Columbia River Estuary are given. An example is resilience which is used seven times in the proposal either as a deliverable or a scoring attribute. Another is biological integrity.

Objective 3 under Critical Uncertainties Research is given as " – Juvenile salmon rearing to adult return:Evaluate juvenile salmon life history strategies and their contributions to adult returns in selected tributaries (2014 – 2018). Methods: Chemical analysis of adult Chinook otoliths from Grays, Coweeman, Lewis, Willamette, Sandy, Priest Rapids, Wenatchee, and Methow; Water chemistry of tidal tributary and main-stem sites to evaluate whether otolith barium can be used to reconstruct salmon entry into tidal-fresh environments; consider strontium marking – pending results from 2011 analysis."

This is a very key objective, and more information is required. What is the design of this work? It is likely this objective is more important than several of the others in the areas of critical uncertainties.

2. History: Accomplishments, Results, and Adaptive Management (Evaluation of Results)

The history of the project is thoroughly documented. The program has made excellent accomplishment toward estuary restoration. Unfortunately information on how survival of salmonids will be improved is still lacking and is not really focused on as a critical uncertainty (see ISAB 2012-6 review of CEERP). The draft report by Cooney and Holzer (2011) (cited in the proposal) dealing with efforts to establish juvenile survival rates in restored areas at the mouths of tributaries including Coweeman River, Grays River, Germany Creek, Mill Creek and Abernathy Creek is a step in the right direction.

The Partnership appears to be constantly refining its activities over time, and adaptive management is well thought out. The addition of the landscape databases, tools to help prioritize restoration site selection, and the creation of a three level AEMR protocol are just a few examples. There is still the lingering issue of how adaptive management will be practiced to cope with some emerging factors, especially invasive species, but presentations indicated some good progress is being made to control invasive plants. Management modifications are made as a result of evaluation of past actions and results but do not seem to include active experimental manipulation to test and revise hypotheses as a formal adaptive management implementation.

It would be useful to have a listing of reports and papers that have specifically resulted from the efforts of project members, split out by projects under the umbrella and the umbrella project itself. An indication of good coordination and cooperation might be a list of papers co-authored by people in both categories.

3. Project Relationships, Emerging Limiting Factors, and Tailored Questions

As described in the proposal, the Estuary Partnership works with many partners. Major funding sources include BPA, USACE, NOAA, and USEPA. Partners performing restoration or other contractual work under the Partnership include CREST, CLT, PNNL, Cowlitz Indian Tribe, WDFW, ODFW, watershed councils, soil and water conservation districts, and other entities. The Partnership has established itself as the focal institution for habitat restoration and protection in the region by its relationships with the above groups and local private and public landowners. It serves as the region’s main means of dispersing habitat restoration monies from federal agencies to local entities. Solicitation, review, and selection criteria are clearly documented. A conflict of interest policy is clearly detailed.

The tailored questions were answered. It was noted that the partners, not LCREP, deal with data management and protocol development.

The integration of the 55 reference sites into the monitoring program is an impressive aspect of the monitoring program. In general this appears to be a well thought out RME program.

A number of emerging limiting factors were identified in the proposal but it should be noted the problems are not really emerging. They are here now. Foremost among those was climate change. Changing weather patterns are expected to create warming trends in water temperature, shift the Columbia River plume and raise sea levels causing inundation of floodplain areas. Additionally, increasing storm intensities and wave heights are expected to exacerbate flooding and coastal erosion. Sustained periods of coastal upwelling caused by climate change will reduce dissolved oxygen in coastal waters and also increase acidification of ocean waters which will likely impact the food web and decrease salmonid survival in near coastal waters. The restoration actions carried out by the Partnership cannot address these large issues. However, the sponsors point out that habitat actions in the lower river can improve water temperatures and food web integrity at landscape scales. The occurrence of contaminants or toxics is another acknowledged emerging limiting factor. Contaminants can clearly influence salmonid survival by inducing sub-lethal effects and by reducing the prey base. Lack of funding to address this issue is a major problem. The Partnership is working with a number of partners including the Yakama Nation to identify high priority contaminant sites in the lower river for potential cleanup actions.

4. Deliverables, Work Elements, Metrics, and Methods

Deliverables are clearly identified and related to work elements. Objectives are clearly related to deliverables. Metrics and methods are linked to cited documentation.

One specific concern was identified in the Large Habitat Program:

1. Holistic Vision and Plan - It is stated that the Restoration Prioritization Strategy will use a Habitat Suitability Index (HIS) Model for juvenile Chinook salmon, which uses model outputs from an Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) hydrodynamic model to predict times and locations that meet suitable water temperature, depth and velocity criteria (Bottom et al. 2005a) for juvenile salmon. However, HIS can be difficult to interpret ecologically (Petts 2009) and is somewhat incompatible with the ecosystem approach advocated by the sponsor. It would be helpful to find out how HIS results will be used in the various restoration projects.

Reference

Petts, Geoffrey E., 2009. Instream Flow Science for Sustainable River Management. Journal of the American Water Resources Association (JAWRA) 45(5):1071-1086. 

Specific comments on protocols and methods described in MonitoringMethods.org

This group has developed most of the protocols and methods used in estuary monitoring and most of the techniques are reliable and widely adopted (Roegner et al. 2009).

One question for the Partnership would be how or if they will incorporate or use AEM methods recently produced by Roni et al. (2013) in their Action Effectiveness Monitoring of Tributary Habitat Improvement: a Programmatic Approach for the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. If so how will they use them and how does the Roni et al (2013) report relate to the Johnson et al. (2013) report cited below on estuary monitoring? What is the status of the Johnson et al. (2013) plan and how close is it to being implemented

Modified by Dal Marsters on 9/26/2013 10:03:20 AM.

Modified by Dal Marsters on 9/26/2013 10:04:13 AM.
Documentation Links:
  • Proponent Response (7/18/2013)

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 2003-011-00-NPCC-20131126
Project: 2003-011-00 - Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration
Review: 2013 Geographic Category Review
Proposal: GEOREV-2003-011-00
Proposal State: Pending BPA Response
Approved Date: 11/5/2013
Recommendation: Implement with Conditions
Comments: Implement with conditions through 2016. See Programmatic Issue and Recommendation D for monitoring in the estuary. See Programmatic Issue and Recommendation B for umbrella projects.
Conditions:
Council Condition #1 ISRP Qualification: ISRP or ISAB would like to review the final plan—See Programmatic Issue and Recommendation D for monitoring in the estuary.
Council Condition #2 ISRP Qualification: Please provide details of how the 51 reference monitoring sites were selected and justified—See Programmatic Issue and Recommendation D for monitoring in the estuary.
Council Condition #3 Programmatic Issue: D. Columbia River Estuary – effectiveness monitoring—See Programmatic Issue and Recommendation D for monitoring in the estuary.
Council Condition #4 Programmatic Issue: B. Evaluate and Improve Umbrella Projects—See Programmatic Issue and Recommendation B for umbrella projects.
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review

Legal Assessment (In-Lieu)

Assessment Number: 2003-011-00-INLIEU-20090521
Project Number: 2003-011-00
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 10/6/2006
In Lieu Rating: Problems May Exist
Cost Share Rating: 2 - May be reasonable
Comment: Multiple restoration activities, other entities may be authorized required; need to confirm that screening or other criteria to ensures BPA funding not being used for specific activities another entity is required to perform, but otherwise cost share appears reasonable.

Capital Assessment

Assessment Number: 2003-011-00-CAPITAL-20090618
Project Number: 2003-011-00
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 2/27/2007
Capital Rating: Does Not Qualify for Capital Funding
Capital Asset Category: None
Comment: None

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 2003-011-00-ISRP-20060831
Project: 2003-011-00 - Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 8/31/2006
Final Round ISRP Date: None
Final Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria (Qualified)
Final Round ISRP Comment:
The proponents have made a sincere effort to respond to the ISRP's questions. The responses by the LCREP were helpful in revealing the general protocols, monitoring plans, and criteria for prioritization of projects (many completed by other organizations, their collaborators, and personnel). LCREP is clearly supporting a broad suite of estuary restoration project in the Lower Columbia River Basin and funds funnel through it to numerous groups. The Partnership appears to be delegating much of the evaluation of results to the other groups, so their role in the projects needs clarification.

Responses by the sponsors reinforced the ISRP's conclusion that the most important aspect of the project is the adaptive management goal under Objective 2 (Applied Adaptive Management Program for Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary). This objective is currently justified and fundable. The proposed workshop among the many agencies and organizations involved in estuarine research and monitoring should be beneficial in providing a "landscape" review of ongoing and proposed work that will assist in collaboration and prioritizing future research and restoration activities. Results and recommendations of the workshop should be made available on-line.

The qualification in the ISRP's final recommendation concerns a deficiency of the sponsor's response regarding Objective 1 (Habitat Restoration Project Implementation Fund). The ISRP asked explicitly ("provide empirical evidence of whether the projects are progressing toward their objectives") for information on results of restoration projects supported by LCREP. Detailed information, however, was not provided in the response. The proponents need to provide a table documenting all projects funded through LCREP, including dates of initiation and completion, funded dollars, agencies conducting the work, location, type of project (e.g., dike breaching), monitoring protocols, and a link to results or publications evaluating effectiveness of restoration actions. The ISRP asked about the distinction between the Science Team and the Science Work Group and the qualifications of the two groups. The response was very good. Input from LCREP's excellent Science Work Group should be sought when developing the information on results of the restoration projects.

The sponsors provided adequate responses to the ISRP's concerns about methods to be used in Objective 3 "Identify and Characterize Reference Sites for Action Effectiveness Research and Status/Trends Monitoring in the Lower Columbia River." The estuarine classification system being developed in Project #200300700 will provide the basis for sampling site stratification, and the collaboration between the groups appears to be good. However, the former project may not produce a peer reviewed classification system in time for their needs. The ISRP recommends that a contingency plan be developed in case this occurs.

The ISRP appreciated the sponsor's detailed responses to the ISRP's concerns about models and strategies to control invasive vegetation.
Documentation Links:

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 2003-011-00-NPCC-20090924
Project: 2003-011-00 - Columbia River Estuary Habitat Restoration
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Approved Date: 10/23/2006
Recommendation: Fund
Comments: Budget reductions not specific. Project to be implemented as proposed with reduced scope.

Project Relationships: None

Name Role Organization
Debrah Marriott Supervisor Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership
Catherine Corbett Project Lead Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership
Thomas Argent Administrative Contact Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership
Anne Creason Project Manager Bonneville Power Administration
John Skidmore Supervisor Bonneville Power Administration
Travis Kessler Env. Compliance Lead Bonneville Power Administration
Elisabeth Bowers Env. Compliance Lead Bonneville Power Administration
Daniel Evans Interested Party Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership
Tabatha Rood Interested Party Bonneville Power Administration