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Project Summary

Project 1996-011-00 - Walla Walla Juvenile and Adult Passage Improvements

Please Note: This project is the product of one or more merges and/or splits from other projects. Historical data automatically included here are limited to the current project and previous generation (the “parent” projects) only. The Project Relationships section details the nature of the relationships between this project and the previous generation. To learn about the complete ancestry of this project, please review the Project Relationships section on the Project Summary page of each parent project.

Project Number:
1996-011-00
Title:
Walla Walla Juvenile and Adult Passage Improvements
Summary:
Provide safe passage for migrating juvenile and adult salmonids in the Walla Walla Subbasin by constructing and maintaining passage facilities at irrigation diversion dams and canals and other passage barriers.
Proposer:
None
Proponent Orgs:
Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR) (Tribe)
Starting FY:
1996
Ending FY:
2032
Stage:
Area:
Province Subbasin %
Columbia Plateau Walla Walla 100.00%
Purpose:
Habitat
Emphasis:
Restoration/Protection
Focal Species:
All Anadromous Fish
All Anadromous Salmonids
Bass, Largemouth
Bass, Smallmouth
Freshwater Mussels
Lamprey, Pacific
Lamprey, Western Brook
OBSOLETE-Carp, Common
OBSOLETE-Catfish
OBSOLETE-Crappie, Black
OBSOLETE-Crappie, White
OBSOLETE-Perch, Yellow
OBSOLETE-Pikeminnow, Northern
OBSOLETE-Trout, Brown
Trout, Bull (threatened)
Trout, Interior Redband
Trout, Rainbow
Whitefish, Mountain
Species Benefit:
Anadromous: 100.0%   Resident: 0.0%   Wildlife: 0.0%
Tags:
None
Special:
None
BiOp Association:
FCRPS 2008 – view list of

Tributary Habitat Implementation 2007 to 2009

No photos have been uploaded yet for this project.

Summary of Budgets

To view all expenditures for all fiscal years, click "Project Exp. by FY"

Expense SOY Budget Working Budget Contracted Amount Modified Contract Amount Expenditures *
FY2016 (Previous) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla $0 $0 $0 $0
FY2017 (Current) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla $0 $0 $0 $0
FY2018 (Next) $0 $0 $0 $0

Capital SOY Budget Working Budget Contracted Amount Modified Contract Amount Expenditures *
FY2016 (Previous) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla $0 $0 $0 $0
FY2017 (Current) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla $0 $0 $0 $0
FY2018 (Next) $0 $0 $0 $0

* Expenditures data includes accruals and are based on data through 28-Feb-2017

Decided Budget Transfers  (FY2016 - FY2018)

Acct FY Acct Type Amount Fund Budget Decision Date
FY2016 Capital $250,000 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Fish Accord Review 05/02/2008
FY2016 Capital $250,000 To: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla CTUIR move budgets from 1996-011-00 to 2009-026-00 09/11/2009
FY2016 Expense $15,000 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Fish Accord Review 05/02/2008
FY2016 Expense $2,830 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Fish Accord project COLA 11/21/2008
FY2016 Expense $17,830 To: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla CTUIR move budgets from 1996-011-00 to 2009-026-00 09/11/2009
FY2017 Capital $250,000 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Fish Accord Review 05/02/2008
FY2017 Capital $250,000 To: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla CTUIR move budgets from 1996-011-00 to 2009-026-00 09/11/2009
FY2017 Expense $15,000 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Fish Accord Review 05/02/2008
FY2017 Expense $3,276 From: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla Fish Accord project COLA 11/21/2008
FY2017 Expense $18,276 To: Fish Accord - LRT - Umatilla CTUIR move budgets from 1996-011-00 to 2009-026-00 09/11/2009

Pending Budget Decision?  No


No Project Cost Share

FY2016 0 %
FY2015 0 %
FY2014 0 %
FY2013 0 %
FY2012 0 %
FY2011 0 %
FY2010 0 %
FY2009 0 %
FY2008 0 %
FY2007 0 %
Fiscal Year Cost Share Partner Total Proposed
Contribution
Total Confirmed
Contribution

Contracts

The table below contains contracts with the following statuses: Active, Complete, History, Issued.
Capital Contracts:
Number Contractor Name Title Status Contracted Amount Dates
422 REL 36 SOW MWH Global, Inc. PI 199601100 JUV SCREENS & TRAPS WALLA WALLA History $1,269,447 10/1/2003 - 9/30/2005
Expense Contracts:
Number Contractor Name Title Status Contracted Amount Dates
452 REL 1 SOW JD White Company, Inc. BA PREPARATION FOR GARDEN CITY/LOWDEN 2 DIVERSION PROJECTS History $3,952 9/25/2000 - 12/31/2000
2362 SOW Applied Archaeological Research MILTON DITCH SURVEY History $3,885 9/28/2000 - 11/15/2000
429 REL 18 SOW Fishpro, Inc. 1996-011-00 FACILITIES EXPANSION AT HAGERMAN FISH CULTURE EXPER. History $10,000 6/1/2001 - 6/30/2001
428 REL 7 SOW MWH Global, Inc. 1996-011-00 HOFER DAM PASSAGE IMPROVEMENTS - HARZA History $202,000 8/14/2001 - 6/29/2002
428 REL 8 SOW MWH Global, Inc. 1996-011-02 GARDEN CITY/LOWDEN2 - PHASE 3 History $155,080 8/15/2001 - 12/31/2001
428 REL 10 SOW MWH Global, Inc. 1996-011-00 HOFER DAM FISH PASSAGE IMPROVEMENT History $15,000 10/26/2001 - 12/16/2001
428 REL 11 SOW MWH Global, Inc. 1996-011-00 HOFER DAM FISH PASSAGE IMPROVEMENT-STREAM GAUGE INS History $9,500 10/26/2001 - 12/31/2001
7402 SOW Gardena Farms Irrigation District #13 1996-011-00 O & M FOR BURLINGAME SCREENS & LADDER History $156,063 9/1/2001 - 9/30/2004
422 REL 28 SOW MWH Global, Inc. 1996-011-00 GARDEN CITY CONSTRUCTION History $1,157,540 11/15/2001 - 2/28/2003
14887 SOW Milton Freewater Water Control District 1996-011-00 WALLA WALLA JUVENILE AND ADULT PASSAGE IMPROVEMENTS History $13,000 8/15/2003 - 9/30/2003
20328 SOW Gardena Farms Irrigation District #13 1996-011-00 O&M FOR BURLINGAME & GARDEN CITY LOWDEN 2 FACILITIES History $79,756 10/1/2004 - 9/30/2005
24409 SOW Milton Freewater Water Control District 199601100 EXP NURSERY BRIDGE COST-SHARE, WALLA WALLA History $30,940 9/1/2005 - 12/31/2005
24598 SOW Gardena Farms Irrigation District #13 1996-011-00 EXP O&M - GARDENA & GARDEN CITY/LOWDEN 2 FACILITIES History $66,358 10/1/2005 - 9/30/2006
26095 SOW Hudson Bay District Improvement Company 1996-011-00 EXP O&M LITTLE WALLA WALLA & NURSERY BRIDGE History $68,699 1/1/2006 - 12/31/2006
28891 SOW Walla Walla County Conservation District (SWCD) 199601100 EXP GOSE STREET FISH PASSAGE IMPROVEMENTS History $250,000 8/23/2006 - 12/30/2006



Annual Progress Reports
Expected (since FY2004):6
Completed:5
On time:5
Status Reports
Completed:28
On time:17
Avg Days Late:0

Earliest Subsequent           Accepted Count of Contract Deliverables
Contract Contract(s) Title Contractor Start End Status Reports Complete Green Yellow Red Total % Green and Complete Canceled
7402 20328, 24598 1996-011-00 O & M FOR BURLINGAME SCREENS & LADDER Gardena Farms Irrigation District #13 09/2001 09/2001 History 5 13 0 0 0 13 100.00% 0
5545 26095 1996-011-00 O&M FOR LITTLE WALLA WALLA SCREENS/TRAP Hudson Bay District Improvement Company 05/2001 05/2001 History 6 11 3 0 0 14 100.00% 0
24409 199601100 EXP NURSERY BRIDGE COST-SHARE, WALLA WALLA Milton Freewater Water Control District 09/2005 09/2005 History 2 4 0 0 1 5 80.00% 0
652 REL 19 652 REL 34, 26934 REL 6, 26934 REL 17, 26934 REL 24, 26934 REL 38, 56065 REL 4, 56065 REL 9, 56065 REL 11 1996-011-00 WALLA WALLA FISH PASSAGE M&E Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 01/2002 01/2002 Issued 45 44 0 0 1 45 97.78% 1
28891 199601100 EXP GOSE STREET FISH PASSAGE IMPROVEMENTS Walla Walla County Conservation District (SWCD) 08/2006 08/2006 History 4 2 0 0 0 2 100.00% 0
Project Totals 193 292 38 0 40 370 89.19% 23


Historical from: 2007-396-00
Earliest Subsequent           Accepted Count of Contract Deliverables
Contract Contract(s) Title Contractor Start End Status Reports Complete Green Yellow Red Total % Green and Complete Canceled
33295 2007-396-00 CAP TOUCHET CONSOLIDATION Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) 06/2007 06/2007 Closed 3 5 0 0 0 5 100.00% 0
34855 38897, 44015, 49225, 54456, 59331, 63566, 67282, 70741, 74306 200739600 EXP RESTORE WALLA WALLA RIVER FLOW Walla Walla Basin Watershed Council 09/2007 09/2007 Issued 42 94 35 0 9 138 93.48% 4
38680 2007-396-00 CAP GOSE STREET PASSAGE - FINISH Walla Walla County Conservation District (SWCD) 07/2008 07/2008 Closed 2 4 0 0 0 4 100.00% 0
38293 2007-396-00 CAP NURSERY BRIDGE COST-SHARE Milton Freewater Water Control District 06/2008 06/2008 Closed 4 4 0 0 0 4 100.00% 0
36326 43565, 57872 200739600 CAP FINAL DESIGN BERG-WILL & OLD LOWDEN SCREENS Walla Walla County Conservation District (SWCD) 01/2008 01/2008 Closed 15 10 0 0 10 20 50.00% 0
40082 2007-396-00 CAP GFID IRRIGATION EFFICIENCY& IS FLOW Gardena Farms Irrigation District #13 09/2008 09/2008 Closed 3 2 0 0 2 4 50.00% 2
39456 2007-396-00 CAP SPRING CREEK PASSAGE - WWCCD Walla Walla County Conservation District (SWCD) 09/2008 09/2008 Closed 6 5 0 0 0 5 100.00% 0
35684 49378, 60272, 63647, 67276 200739600 CAP RESTORE WALLA WALLA RIVER FLOW Walla Walla Basin Watershed Council 09/2007 09/2007 Closed 35 68 0 0 15 83 81.93% 16
42762 54088, 58147, 63329 200739600 CAP GFID PIPING PROJECT - WWCCD Walla Walla County Conservation District (SWCD) 05/2009 05/2009 Closed 17 20 0 0 2 22 90.91% 0
BPA-004913 HBDIC Recharge Site Bonneville Power Administration 10/2010 10/2010 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-006209 HBDIC Recharge site purchase or easement Bonneville Power Administration 10/2011 10/2011 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
49521 2007-396-00 CAP OL-BW PIPELINE, AQUIFER RECHARGE- WWCCD Walla Walla County Conservation District (SWCD) 09/2010 09/2010 Closed 4 6 0 0 0 6 100.00% 0
BPA-006859 Walla Walla Basin Bonneville Power Administration 10/2012 10/2012 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-007589 Walla Walla Basin Recharge Bonneville Power Administration 10/2013 10/2013 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-008132 2015 Land Acquisiton Bonneville Power Administration 10/2014 10/2014 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-008674 FY16 Land Acquisition/Task Order Bonneville Power Administration 10/2015 10/2015 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BPA-009469 FY17 Land Acquisitions & TBL Task Orders Bonneville Power Administration 10/2016 10/2016 Active 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Project Totals 193 292 38 0 40 370 89.19% 23


Review: 2013 Geographic Category Review

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 2007-396-00-ISRP-20130610
Project: 2007-396-00 - Walla Walla Basinwide Tributary Passage and Flow
Review: 2013 Geographic Category Review
Proposal Number: GEOREV-2007-396-00
Completed Date: 6/11/2013
Final Round ISRP Date: 6/10/2013
Final Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria
Final Round ISRP Comment:

This project is clearly addressing a factor that is limiting fish production in the Walla Walla Basin: limited instream flow. There is very good evidence that they have made significant progress in addressing this issue. For example, the project has performed useful fish passage and habitat restoration in the Walla Walla subbasin and has identified additional sites where irrigation efficiencies, aquifer recharge actions, fish passage improvements and restoration of floodplain processes should occur. The project has a strong RM&E component and is using the information generated to modify restoration plans. In future proposals, the project sponsors should include additional information on project relationships in the Walla Walla Basin. A little more detail on how fish movement and presence/absence data will be collected would have been helpful. Also, some additional information on the bank stabilization deliverable below the Nursery Bridge grade control structures should have been included in the proposal.

1. Purpose: Significance to Regional Programs, Technical Background, and Objectives

This project is significant regionally as seasonal lack of instream flow impacts listed fishes in the Walla Walla River. The activities proposed are consistent with the Walla Walla Subbasin Plan, the priority actions listed in the Bi-State Habitat Conservation Process, and in the Draft Bull Trout and Steelhead Recovery Plans. The project has three goals, to restore up- and downstream passage for juvenile and adult salmonids; to recharge aquifers to sustain and augment river, tributary, and spring flows; and to implement irrigation efficiency programs to increase stream flows. Ten objectives, including improving water quality, providing additional instream flows, promoting water conservation, protecting conserved water via Oregon and Washington Water Trust laws, monitoring and management of hydrologic data, expanding the size and duration of cold water refugia, and improving base river flows through floodplains are being used to address these goals. The objectives are appropriate for this project. They all focus on restoring appropriate flow conditions and water quality throughout the Walla Walla River watershed.

The history of the water projects on the Walla Walla is described sufficiently. Efforts to enhance flow in the river have been ongoing for over a decade with some notable successes. Previously dewatered reaches now have year-round flow. The extensive hydrology monitoring network enabled the identification of declining groundwater levels (partly due to increased efficiency of the irrigation system). Reduced ground water levels have eliminated many springs, which had made an important contribution to summer base flow and provided thermal refuge. They have been experimenting with various methods of enhancing groundwater storage in the basin and have had some success.

2. History: Accomplishments, Results, and Adaptive Management (Evaluation of Results)

The Walla Walla Basin Watershed Council (WWBWC) and partners developed a water monitoring network in 2001 to understand the role that ditches and irrigation practices had in aquifer maintenance in the subbasin. Results from this monitoring work have guided future restoration actions. For example, during the past eight years the WWBWC has worked with multiple partners to develop aquifer recharge projects, for example the Hulette Johnson, Hall-Wentland, and Stiller Pond sites and the Anspach and Trumbull projects. Also the WWBWC recently completed a Walla Walla Basin Aquifer Recharge Plan. Additionally, the WWBWC collects groundwater and surface water data and distributes it to basin partners and local, state, and federal agencies. Some of these data were used to develop the TMDL for water temperature in Oregon’s part of the Walla Walla River.

A thorough discussion of project history is provided in the proposal along with links to other project related documents. The project has been using adaptive management processes to improve its program of flow enhancement. Initially the project focused on areas where immediate short-term savings in water would occur. Now, projects are taking place in areas where water savings can improve stream flow later on. Experiments were performed that evaluated the effectiveness of four water distribution systems in an aquifer recharge area. One distribution system that was identified as being the most effective is now being used in other aquifer recharge projects. Additionally, the newly completed Walla Walla River Alternatives Analysis and Conceptual Design Milton-Freewater Levee and Habitat analysis is being used to identify opportunities for fish passage and fish habitat improvements. The analysis includes some HEC-RAS modeling which performs channel flow determinations and floodplain identification.

Evaluation of Results

Prior to this proposal submission, the Walla Walla Basin Watershed Council, Walla Walla Conservation District, Gardena Farms Irrigation District, CTUIR, and WDFW had projects funded by this project. Previous work involved establishing over 100 monitoring wells, 60 stream flow gauges, the production of a hydrologic data base called AQUARIS, the creation of 124 miles of Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) riparian buffers, the installation of over 300 fish screens by ODFW and WDFW, removal of 15 significant fish barriers, over 18.6 miles of ditch piping in Oregon, 85 on-farm water efficiency projects, aquifer recharge research and implementation, the enactment of soil retention practices on 80% of the steep wheat land in Columbia County (WA), and the completion of the Walla Walla Basin Aquifer Recharge Strategic Plan. This work has helped restore fish passage, instream flows, and recharge shallow aquifers.

3. Project Relationships, Emerging Limiting Factors, and Tailored Questions

The project is linked to the Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement, Walla Walla River Juvenile and Adult Passage Improvements, Walla Walla River Basin Monitoring and Evaluation, Walla Walla River Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, and Umatilla Fish Passage Operations projects. Partners include ODFW, WDFW, CTUIR, OWRD, WDOE, OSU, USDA, Hudson Bay District Improvement Company, Walla Walla Irrigation District and Fruitvale Water Users Association, ODEQ, Walla Walla County Conservation District, and private landowners. However, how this project and the other projects mentioned above coordinate with one another is incompletely described. Some additional discussion of how this project interacts with the habitat restoration and fish monitoring efforts in the watershed would have been useful.

The sponsors have established a very thorough hydrological monitoring system in the watershed. Detailed data on river and stream flow, groundwater level, water temperature and water chemistry are being collected. The proposal also demonstrates that these data are being used to inform restoration project designs. There is a good data storage system in place and the data are available online. Maintaining this system is critical to ensure compliance with water agreements.

Climate change was recognized as an emerging limiting factor. A climate change projection specifically for the Walla Walla Basin has been produced and results indicate that there will be an increase in cold-season flows and a decrease in late spring-summer stream flows. They are planning for such changes by shunting higher winter flows into aquifer recharge areas so that summer flows can be augmented from the recharged aquifers. Additionally, new piping is being installed to reduce seepage and improve irrigation efficiencies, so this emerging limiting factor is being addressed. There was no discussion, however, of how future development or changes in agriculture could influence water availability. Some consideration of these factors should be included in the project. Additionally, it is not clear if the hydrological model has been used to forecast what happens under extreme events? For example, suppose that drought conditions occur in two or more consecutive years, can the model be used to forecast water availability under this circumstance? And if so, have plans been made on how water will be allocated to irrigators as well as for fish passage?

4. Deliverables, Work Elements, Metrics, and Methods

The project has seventeen deliverables; fourteen of them are directed toward specific projects in the Walla Walla subbasin. The general goals of the specific projects are to improve irrigation efficiency and fish passage, restore floodplain processes, and start aquifer recharge programs. In several instances, engineered drawings or other plans have already been developed for these projects. The remaining three deliverables have more general goals. In one case, the objective is to monitor irrigation flows via telemetry and use automation to open and close valves or gates to improve water management. In another instance the sponsors wish to establish water right “maps” in project areas so that easements or other arrangements can be made to protect instream flow enhancements. The project has also used hydrologic mapping and monitoring to help determine where restoration projects should occur. The sponsors wish to continue this work to monitor status and trends in water temperatures and flow. Additionally, these data will be connected to fish presence and movement information to see how fish react to water flow and temperature improvements. Some information on how fish movement and presence/absence data are collected should have been included in the proposal.

The deliverables are mostly appropriate for the objectives of this project, and the work elements are described adequately. The deliverable for channel stabilization below the Nursery Bridge grade control structures, however, does not contain enough detail on the nature of the bank stability issue or the measures that are planned to address the problem. More detail on this deliverable should be included.

Specific comments on protocols and methods described in MonitoringMethods.org

Three major RM&E protocols are listed and all were developed by project personnel. Most are largely complete and are appropriate for the types of data being collected.

First Round ISRP Date: 6/10/2013
First Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria
First Round ISRP Comment:

This project is clearly addressing a factor that is limiting fish production in the Walla Walla Basin: limited instream flow. There is very good evidence that they have made significant progress in addressing this issue. For example, the project has performed useful fish passage and habitat restoration in the Walla Walla subbasin and has identified additional sites where irrigation efficiencies, aquifer recharge actions, fish passage improvements and restoration of floodplain processes should occur. The project has a strong RM&E component and is using the information generated to modify restoration plans. In future proposals, the project sponsors should include additional information on project relationships in the Walla Walla Basin. A little more detail on how fish movement and presence/absence data will be collected would have been helpful. Also, some additional information on the bank stabilization deliverable below the Nursery Bridge grade control structures should have been included in the proposal.

1. Purpose: Significance to Regional Programs, Technical Background, and Objectives

This project is significant regionally as seasonal lack of instream flow impacts listed fishes in the Walla Walla River. The activities proposed are consistent with the Walla Walla Subbasin Plan, the priority actions listed in the Bi-State Habitat Conservation Process, and in the Draft Bull Trout and Steelhead Recovery Plans. The project has three goals, to restore up- and downstream passage for juvenile and adult salmonids; to recharge aquifers to sustain and augment river, tributary, and spring flows; and to implement irrigation efficiency programs to increase stream flows. Ten objectives, including improving water quality, providing additional instream flows, promoting water conservation, protecting conserved water via Oregon and Washington Water Trust laws, monitoring and management of hydrologic data, expanding the size and duration of cold water refugia, and improving base river flows through floodplains are being used to address these goals. The objectives are appropriate for this project. They all focus on restoring appropriate flow conditions and water quality throughout the Walla Walla River watershed.

The history of the water projects on the Walla Walla is described sufficiently. Efforts to enhance flow in the river have been ongoing for over a decade with some notable successes. Previously dewatered reaches now have year-round flow. The extensive hydrology monitoring network enabled the identification of declining groundwater levels (partly due to increased efficiency of the irrigation system). Reduced ground water levels have eliminated many springs, which had made an important contribution to summer base flow and provided thermal refuge. They have been experimenting with various methods of enhancing groundwater storage in the basin and have had some success.

2. History: Accomplishments, Results, and Adaptive Management (Evaluation of Results)

The Walla Walla Basin Watershed Council (WWBWC) and partners developed a water monitoring network in 2001 to understand the role that ditches and irrigation practices had in aquifer maintenance in the subbasin. Results from this monitoring work have guided future restoration actions. For example, during the past eight years the WWBWC has worked with multiple partners to develop aquifer recharge projects, for example the Hulette Johnson, Hall-Wentland, and Stiller Pond sites and the Anspach and Trumbull projects. Also the WWBWC recently completed a Walla Walla Basin Aquifer Recharge Plan. Additionally, the WWBWC collects groundwater and surface water data and distributes it to basin partners and local, state, and federal agencies. Some of these data were used to develop the TMDL for water temperature in Oregon’s part of the Walla Walla River.

A thorough discussion of project history is provided in the proposal along with links to other project related documents. The project has been using adaptive management processes to improve its program of flow enhancement. Initially the project focused on areas where immediate short-term savings in water would occur. Now, projects are taking place in areas where water savings can improve stream flow later on. Experiments were performed that evaluated the effectiveness of four water distribution systems in an aquifer recharge area. One distribution system that was identified as being the most effective is now being used in other aquifer recharge projects. Additionally, the newly completed Walla Walla River Alternatives Analysis and Conceptual Design Milton-Freewater Levee and Habitat analysis is being used to identify opportunities for fish passage and fish habitat improvements. The analysis includes some HEC-RAS modeling which performs channel flow determinations and floodplain identification.

Evaluation of Results

Prior to this proposal submission, the Walla Walla Basin Watershed Council, Walla Walla Conservation District, Gardena Farms Irrigation District, CTUIR, and WDFW had projects funded by this project. Previous work involved establishing over 100 monitoring wells, 60 stream flow gauges, the production of a hydrologic data base called AQUARIS, the creation of 124 miles of Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) riparian buffers, the installation of over 300 fish screens by ODFW and WDFW, removal of 15 significant fish barriers, over 18.6 miles of ditch piping in Oregon, 85 on-farm water efficiency projects, aquifer recharge research and implementation, the enactment of soil retention practices on 80% of the steep wheat land in Columbia County (WA), and the completion of the Walla Walla Basin Aquifer Recharge Strategic Plan. This work has helped restore fish passage, instream flows, and recharge shallow aquifers.

3. Project Relationships, Emerging Limiting Factors, and Tailored Questions

The project is linked to the Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement, Walla Walla River Juvenile and Adult Passage Improvements, Walla Walla River Basin Monitoring and Evaluation, Walla Walla River Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, and Umatilla Fish Passage Operations projects. Partners include ODFW, WDFW, CTUIR, OWRD, WDOE, OSU, USDA, Hudson Bay District Improvement Company, Walla Walla Irrigation District and Fruitvale Water Users Association, ODEQ, Walla Walla County Conservation District, and private landowners. However, how this project and the other projects mentioned above coordinate with one another is incompletely described. Some additional discussion of how this project interacts with the habitat restoration and fish monitoring efforts in the watershed would have been useful.

The sponsors have established a very thorough hydrological monitoring system in the watershed. Detailed data on river and stream flow, groundwater level, water temperature and water chemistry are being collected. The proposal also demonstrates that these data are being used to inform restoration project designs. There is a good data storage system in place and the data are available online. Maintaining this system is critical to ensure compliance with water agreements.

Climate change was recognized as an emerging limiting factor. A climate change projection specifically for the Walla Walla Basin has been produced and results indicate that there will be an increase in cold-season flows and a decrease in late spring-summer stream flows. They are planning for such changes by shunting higher winter flows into aquifer recharge areas so that summer flows can be augmented from the recharged aquifers. Additionally, new piping is being installed to reduce seepage and improve irrigation efficiencies, so this emerging limiting factor is being addressed. There was no discussion, however, of how future development or changes in agriculture could influence water availability. Some consideration of these factors should be included in the project. Additionally, it is not clear if the hydrological model has been used to forecast what happens under extreme events? For example, suppose that drought conditions occur in two or more consecutive years, can the model be used to forecast water availability under this circumstance? And if so, have plans been made on how water will be allocated to irrigators as well as for fish passage?

4. Deliverables, Work Elements, Metrics, and Methods

The project has seventeen deliverables; fourteen of them are directed toward specific projects in the Walla Walla subbasin. The general goals of the specific projects are to improve irrigation efficiency and fish passage, restore floodplain processes, and start aquifer recharge programs. In several instances, engineered drawings or other plans have already been developed for these projects. The remaining three deliverables have more general goals. In one case, the objective is to monitor irrigation flows via telemetry and use automation to open and close valves or gates to improve water management. In another instance the sponsors wish to establish water right “maps” in project areas so that easements or other arrangements can be made to protect instream flow enhancements. The project has also used hydrologic mapping and monitoring to help determine where restoration projects should occur. The sponsors wish to continue this work to monitor status and trends in water temperatures and flow. Additionally, these data will be connected to fish presence and movement information to see how fish react to water flow and temperature improvements. Some information on how fish movement and presence/absence data are collected should have been included in the proposal.

The deliverables are mostly appropriate for the objectives of this project, and the work elements are described adequately. The deliverable for channel stabilization below the Nursery Bridge grade control structures, however, does not contain enough detail on the nature of the bank stability issue or the measures that are planned to address the problem. More detail on this deliverable should be included.

Specific comments on protocols and methods described in MonitoringMethods.org

Three major RM&E protocols are listed and all were developed by project personnel. Most are largely complete and are appropriate for the types of data being collected.

Modified by Dal Marsters on 6/11/2013 1:14:29 PM.
Documentation Links:

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 2007-396-00-NPCC-20131126
Project: 2007-396-00 - Walla Walla Basinwide Tributary Passage and Flow
Review: 2013 Geographic Category Review
Proposal: GEOREV-2007-396-00
Proposal State: Pending BPA Response
Approved Date: 11/5/2013
Recommendation: Implement with Conditions
Comments: Implement through FY 2018. See Programmatic Issue and Recommendation A for effectiveness monitoring.
Conditions:
Council Condition #1 Programmatic Issue: A. Implement Monitoring, and Evaluation at a Regional Scale—See Programmatic Issue and Recommendation A for effectiveness monitoring.
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review

Legal Assessment (In-Lieu)

Assessment Number: 1996-011-00-INLIEU-20090521
Project Number: 1996-011-00
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 10/6/2006
In Lieu Rating: Problems May Exist
Cost Share Rating: 3 - Does not appear reasonable
Comment: Fish passage projects (screening, ladders etc) for agricultural/irrigation diversions; not clear whether entities receiving the fixes already authorized/required to provide for passage; needs confirmation that cost share adequate.

Capital Assessment

Assessment Number: 1996-011-00-CAPITAL-20090618
Project Number: 1996-011-00
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 2/27/2007
Capital Rating: Does Not Qualify for Capital Funding
Capital Asset Category: None
Comment: None
Assessment Number: 2007-396-00-CAPITAL-20090618
Project Number: 2007-396-00
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 11/16/2007
Capital Rating: Qualifies for Capital Funding
Capital Asset Category: Fish Passage Improvement
Comment: This project is a result of combining projects: 2002-036-00 Restore Walla Walla River Flow (which previously was the result of combining 1996-011-00 Walla Walla Juvenile and Adult Passage Improvements; and 2007-330-00 Gardena Farms Irrigation District Irrigation Efficiency and Instream Flow). Capital funding approval submitted by BPA COTR. The COTR, COTR's Manager and BPA Accountant certified that the request meets the BPA F&W capital policy and is approved for capital funding (if capital funds are available).

Independent Scientific Review Panel Assessment

Assessment Number: 1996-011-00-ISRP-20060831
Project: 1996-011-00 - Walla Walla Juvenile and Adult Passage Improvements
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Completed Date: 8/31/2006
Final Round ISRP Date: None
Final Round ISRP Rating: Meets Scientific Review Criteria (Qualified)
Final Round ISRP Comment:
This is one of three closely linked passage proposals in the Walla Walla subbasin. Most of the proposal is well done. The proposal would be improved by reporting results from the subbasin level M&E project in summary format. The project needs to make the connection to biological data collected in the M&E project. This was a similar concern with previous ISRP reviews, and while there has been some improvement, it should be clear by now that projects must indicate results of past efforts clearly, particularly after 10 years of efforts. The efforts and results must be linked to subbasin plans, and this was not a strong area of the proposal. What data will be collected by other entities to evaluate success (or failure)? What are the key reference points from this data that will affect management decisions?
Documentation Links:

Council Recommendation

Assessment Number: 1996-011-00-NPCC-20090924
Project: 1996-011-00 - Walla Walla Juvenile and Adult Passage Improvements
Review: FY07-09 Solicitation Review
Approved Date: 10/23/2006
Recommendation: Fund
Comments: Combine the Walla Walla Juvenile and Adult passage Improvement project (199601100) with Gardena Irrigation Project and Walla Walla Flow.

Project Relationships: This project Merged To 2002-036-00 effective on 2/26/2007
Relationship Description: Work and budgets from projects 2007-330-00, 1996-011-00 and 2007-288-00 combined into 2002-036-00. Later, this combined effort will be combined into 2007-396-00.

This project Split From 2007-396-00 effective on 5/2/2008
Relationship Description: Due to the Fish Accords, starting in FY09, work by the Umatilla Tribe and the associated Fish Accord budget is split from 2007-396-00.

This project Merged To 2009-026-00 effective on 9/11/2009
Relationship Description: Project 1996-011-00 was combined with 2007-396-00, however with the signing of the Fish Accords, the Umatilla Tribe portion was split out again. Initially, 1996-011-00 was used and contracts were set up, since that project hasn't been funded since 2006, BPA management decided to start a new project


Name Role Organization
Gary James Project Lead Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR)
Julie Burke Administrative Contact Umatilla Confederated Tribes (CTUIR)
Sarah Branum (Inactive) Project Manager Bonneville Power Administration
Lisa Marko MacLellan (Inactive) Env. Compliance Lead Bonneville Power Administration
Peter Lofy Supervisor Bonneville Power Administration